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"Share the Good" Contest

This is a time of year when people are making lifestyle changes for good. We all start to focus on maintaining healthy eating, exercise and setting goals for ourselves to keep us eating healthy. However, there are so many others—friends, family members, and neighbors—who could benefit from the fresh variety of fruits and veggies that you’ve been enjoying!  This season, we want to partner with you in the goal to share the good!

Many new customers join our team of faithful customers at this time every year, and many of those new customers are referrals from you! We are always so excited when a new customer signs up and gets on board with “a box of good” that we send out a thank you gift! Be it one of our incredible coffees, artisan sourdough breads, or delicious products from Sweet Creek Foods, we send out one of these offerings to both the new customer and the existing customer that referred them to us!

This has been a fun way for you to sample some of our product offerings, and yet we decided to make it even more fun for you to refer your friends. We are having a “Share the Good” contest! From now through the month of February, not only will you receive the standard thank you gift for your referrals, but for every two people you refer, your name will be entered into a drawing for the chance to win one of three unique prizes!

Chocolate Lovers Cookie Box
A completely unique, beautiful gift package of Breadfarm’s most delicious chocolate concoctions
Cocoa Nibs
Espresso Shortbread
Chocolate Thumbprints
Dark Chocolate Almond Biscotti

Breakfast Selection
½ lb. of Camano Island Coffee Roasters’ Coffee of the Month
Artisan Chuckanut Multigrain Bread
Local Organic Eggs, 1 doz.
Local Creamed Honey, 12 oz.
2 jars of Fruit Spread, 10 oz. each

Lunch Assortment
Artisan Honey Wheat Sandwich Bread
Albacore Tuna, 7.5 oz.
Dill Pickles, 16 oz.
Peanut Butter, 16 oz.
Fruit Spread, 10 oz.

The prize drawing will take place February 26 and winners will be notified immediately thereafter.

We are excited about making your referrals more rewarding! So spread the word! Share the good!

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Beet Salad

Ingredients

1 head lettuce, chopped
2 cups baby spinach
1 ¾ cups (14 oz.) sliced pickled beets, drained
½ red onion, chopped
½ cup walnuts
½ lb sunchokes, sliced in thin rounds
½ cup crumbled feta cheese, optional
½ lb snow peas cut into bite-sized chunks 

Directions

Toast walnuts in a small pan over medium heat, 3 to 4 minutes, then let them cool
Combine chopped lettuce, spinach, beets, onion, and toasted walnuts in a salad bowl
Arrange sliced sunchokes, feta cheese and snow peas on top
Dress salad with your favorite homemade vinaigrette, or use the recipe for Blood Orange Vinaigrette, below

Serves 4

adapted by Marty Cedarland

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Blood Orange Vinaigrette

Ingredients

1/4 cup freshly squeezed blood orange juice (regular orange juice will work here)
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons honey
1/8 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Directions

In a small jar with a tight-fitting cover, combine the orange juice, vinegar, mustard, honey and pepper
Cover and shake well until combined
To store, refrigerate for up to 1 week
Shake orange vinaigrette well before serving

from www.vinaigretterecipes.com

Posted on

"Share the Good" Contest

This is a time of year when people are making lifestyle changes for good. We all start to focus on maintaining healthy eating, exercise and setting goals for ourselves to keep us eating healthy. However, there are so many others—friends, family members, and neighbors—who could benefit from the fresh variety of fruits and veggies that you’ve been enjoying!  This season, we want to partner with you in the goal to share the good!

Many new customers join our team of faithful customers at this time every year, and many of those new customers are referrals from you! We are always so excited when a new customer signs up and gets on board with “a box of good” that we send out a thank you gift! Be it one of our incredible coffees, artisan sourdough breads, or delicious products from Sweet Creek Foods, we send out one of these offerings to both the new customer and the existing customer that referred them to us!

This has been a fun way for you to sample some of our product offerings, and yet we decided to make it even more fun for you to refer your friends. We are having a “Share the Good” contest! From now through the month of February, not only will you receive the standard thank you gift for your referrals, but for every two people you refer, your name will be entered into a drawing for the chance to win one of three unique prizes!

Chocolate Lovers Cookie Box
A completely unique, beautiful gift package of Breadfarm’s most delicious chocolate concoctions
Cocoa Nibs
Espresso Shortbread
Chocolate Thumbprints
Dark Chocolate Almond Biscotti

Breakfast Selection
½ lb. of Camano Island Coffee Roasters’ Coffee of the Month
Artisan Chuckanut Multigrain Bread
Local Organic Eggs, 1 doz.
Local Creamed Honey, 12 oz.
2 jars of Fruit Spread, 10 oz. each

Lunch Assortment
Artisan Honey Wheat Sandwich Bread
Albacore Tuna, 7.5 oz.
Dill Pickles, 16 oz.
Peanut Butter, 16 oz.
Fruit Spread, 10 oz.

The prize drawing will take place February 26 and winners will be notified immediately thereafter.

We are excited about making your referrals more rewarding! So spread the word! Share the good!

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Judge Tristan Klesick??

Last week, I attended the American Farm Bureau (AFB) National Conference which was held in Seattle. The AFB hasn’t held its national conference in Seattle since the 1950s.  Normally I wouldn’t head off to an AFB convention, but it was so close to home that I decided to go.  It didn’t hurt either that the local agricultural bank I work with asked me to come and be a judge at one of the AFB contests.

I served as a judge for the Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet.  Essentially, these are the future leaders of American Agriculture and they are competing in a mock policy meeting. The goal is for the participants to demonstrate their abilities to communicate and build consensus around a certain question that is asked of the group. Each group is made up of four to five participants.  This is a big deal and the winner has had to win their state competition and then has to compete with the best from every other state at the national convention.  The winner takes home a brand new Dodge 4×4 pick up. Needless to say, there were some motivated participants.

The question my group was asked to debate was (paraphrased):  We know that the American food supply is the safest in the world, but how do we get that message out to the public?

This was a pretty loaded question and the participants (three men and one woman) discussed it for about 40 minutes. Afterwards, I was ushered off to a “secret” room to tally my scores and turn in my evaluations. 

Sadly, I do not necessarily agree with the presupposition that America’s food supply is the safest in the world.  I certainly do not believe that our system produces the healthiest food in the world.  Our entire focus as a nation has been to direct national farm policy towards cheap grain and, consequently, cheap and empty calories. And because of this national policy we have created an industrial farm model that doesn’t value quality, nutrition or variety, but values quantity and control of our food supply.  And I, personally, believe that this focus has weakened the safety of our food supply and the quality of our food supply to the point that it drastically impacts our educational systems and health care industries in America. 

I would contend that if American farmers were producing healthy food we wouldn’t have a national healthcare crisis and we would not have children “bouncing off the walls” from being fed a high sugar and overly processed food diet.

Thankfully, the organic farmer has stood up and said, “We are going to grow food that is filled with health and nutrition!”  It is not easy to farm organically, it takes more labor and applying minerals and compost to our fields cost more money. But, if we are going to have a healthy food supply, the soil has to have the nutrients available to grow and raise the healthiest fruits and vegetables Americans and everyone else in this world deserve to eat.

Tristan

Posted on

Judge Tristan Klesick??

Last week, I attended the American Farm Bureau (AFB) National Conference which was held in Seattle. The AFB hasn’t held its national conference in Seattle since the 1950s.  Normally I wouldn’t head off to an AFB convention, but it was so close to home that I decided to go.  It didn’t hurt either that the local agricultural bank I work with asked me to come and be a judge at one of the AFB contests.

I served as a judge for the Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet.  Essentially, these are the future leaders of American Agriculture and they are competing in a mock policy meeting. The goal is for the participants to demonstrate their abilities to communicate and build consensus around a certain question that is asked of the group. Each group is made up of four to five participants.  This is a big deal and the winner has had to win their state competition and then has to compete with the best from every other state at the national convention.  The winner takes home a brand new Dodge 4×4 pick up. Needless to say, there were some motivated participants.

The question my group was asked to debate was (paraphrased):  We know that the American food supply is the safest in the world, but how do we get that message out to the public?

This was a pretty loaded question and the participants (three men and one woman) discussed it for about 40 minutes. Afterwards, I was ushered off to a “secret” room to tally my scores and turn in my evaluations. 

Sadly, I do not necessarily agree with the presupposition that America’s food supply is the safest in the world.  I certainly do not believe that our system produces the healthiest food in the world.  Our entire focus as a nation has been to direct national farm policy towards cheap grain and, consequently, cheap and empty calories. And because of this national policy we have created an industrial farm model that doesn’t value quality, nutrition or variety, but values quantity and control of our food supply.  And I, personally, believe that this focus has weakened the safety of our food supply and the quality of our food supply to the point that it drastically impacts our educational systems and health care industries in America. 

I would contend that if American farmers were producing healthy food we wouldn’t have a national healthcare crisis and we would not have children “bouncing off the walls” from being fed a high sugar and overly processed food diet.

Thankfully, the organic farmer has stood up and said, “We are going to grow food that is filled with health and nutrition!”  It is not easy to farm organically, it takes more labor and applying minerals and compost to our fields cost more money. But, if we are going to have a healthy food supply, the soil has to have the nutrients available to grow and raise the healthiest fruits and vegetables Americans and everyone else in this world deserve to eat.

Tristan

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Zucchini & Potato Bake

Serves 6

Ingredients
2 medium zucchini, quartered and cut into large pieces
4 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks
1 medium red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
1 clove garlic, sliced
1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/4 cup olive oil
Paprika to taste
Salt to taste
Ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
In a medium baking pan, toss together the zucchini, potatoes, red bell pepper, garlic, bread crumbs, parmesan cheese, and olive oil. Season with paprika, salt, and pepper.
Bake 1 hour in the preheated oven, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender and lightly brown.

from www.allrecipes.com

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Yogurt Spinach Dip

Serves 6       

Ingredients

1/4 cup chopped fresh spinach
1/4 cup plain yogurt
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1/2 teaspoon seasoning salt
1/8 teaspoon dried parsley
1/8 teaspoon dried basil
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon ground dry mustard
1/8 teaspoon garlic salt

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together spinach, plain yogurt, mayonnaise, seasoning salt, parsley, basil, oregano, dry mustard and garlic salt. Chill until serving.

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Off and Running

This is the famous time of the New Year’s Resolutions.  We save up all of our energy, build up all the muster we have, to make the big push to change something.  If we could only apply all the time we spend waiting to implement the change to the actual change, most of us would be more successful than less in our new habits.  

The crux of the issue boils down to motivation and accountability.  Some would throw in desire, but I have all the desire I need to start anything, but I really need that motivation that comes from accountability to succeed.  “The experts” say it takes 91 days to change a habit.  I think they are right.  It takes 91 days to make the new habit an old habit.

But if we are going to make it to 91 days, we need a plan with some measurable goals.  But don’t spend too much time thinking about your plan. We love to plan in this country, the shelves are filled with dust covered intentions. You already know what areas you want to improve, pick one and get started! 

So if you need to eat healthier, make a plan to eat a salad every day or bring a lunch to work three days per week.  You might decide to walk for 30 minutes, rain or shine, three or four days a week.  These are measurable goals that will eventually lead to the bigger goal of losing weight or increasing your stamina or whatever. 

So let’s get started!  Most of us already have a mental plan, the plan needs shoe leather.  I can’t resist one farmer’s comment at this time: “It is hard to get the field plowed, if you never put the plow in the field.”  So let’s put the plow in the field.  Plowing isn’t always easy and it isn’t always pretty, but if you don’t start plowing, you can’t plant and if you don’t plant you can’t harvest (your goals).

Now tell a spouse, a friend, your farmer (smile) about your goals and ask them to motivate and encourage and hold you accountable on your new venture.  Just get going. You can’t harvest your goals, until you plow the field.

Happy Plowing!                 

Tristan

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Helping Local People

Another core principle at Klesick Family Farm is to give back to our community. Last year, with your help, the Klesick Family Farm delivered 463 boxes of good to the Stanwood and Snohomish food banks. That is $11,000.00 of quality organic fruits and vegetables. There is no way our farm could meet this need without your help. This is one of the most satisfying aspects of our business. I love meeting local needs with local resources! Thank you for partnering with us to meet this local need. If you would like to join us to help provide quality organic produce to local food banks, visit the “How To Help” page of our new website.

Thanks for a great 2009!