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Red Cabbage and Leek Soup

Yield: 6 Servings | Prep Time: 25 Minutes | Source: www.soscuisine.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 12 cups red cabbage
  • 1 leek, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp curry powder
  • 1 tbsp ginger root, grated
  • 1 pinch salt (optional)
  • Ground pepper to taste (optional)
  • ¼ cup creamy soy preparation for cooking (optional)
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped

Instructions:

  1. Prepare the vegetables: Chop the leek, garlic, and cabbage.
  2. Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the leek and garlic, then sauté 3-4 min until softened. Grate the ginger and add it to the pan. Stir in the curry and cook 1 min with stirring. Lower to heat, then add the cabbage and cook 10 min with occasional stirring.
  3. Pour in the broth, bring it to a boil, cover and simmer until the cabbage is fully cooked, about 15 min. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Take the pan off the heat, let it cool down a few minutes then purée the soup in a blender or food processor. Adjust the seasoning, then ladle the soup into bowls. Garnish with soy preparation and chopped scallions, then serve (warm or at room temperature).
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Roasted Radish and Brussels Sprouts Salad

Yield: 6 Servings | Prep Time: 40 Minutes | Source: www.veggieinspired.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb brussels sprouts (trimmed and halved)
  • 1 lb radishes (trimmed and halved)
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 1/8 tsp pepper (or to taste)

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Place all ingredients in a large bowl and toss well to combine.
  3. Spread out in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  4. Bake for 20-30 minutes until the vegetables are starting to brown and crisp up on the edges.
  5. Serve immediately.
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All Is Well

On Thanksgiving I was pondering family. We had an early meal at 1pm. This Thanksgiving was a little different than most. Joelle and Maleah were in Mexico with our church, building a small house for a family in Mexico. Our church builds 5 or so every year in cooperation with the YWAM base in Ensenada. 

Many hands make light work is certainly true on these mini mission trips. The teams can build, paint, and furnish a home in two days. The homes are more akin to a garage with a bedroom attached but, compared to the pallet or makeshift housing the people are used to, they are perfect, and gratefully received. 

Back at the farm, we pieced together a pretty good Thanksgiving meal. Even though Joelle wasn’t here, her planning was evident. Mind you, I am more than willing to cook up a feast at a moment’s notice, but planning is not my strength. Joelle knows when to start the potatoes, yams, stuffing, squash, etc. I know how to make those, but timing is not my expertise, especially when it comes to multiple dishes at one time.  

I love to cook all the side dishes, but I don’t like to cook turkeys. I made this wonderful Acorn Squash, stuffed with wheat berries, mushrooms, onions, and garlic, with a little lemon and some apples and pomegranate. So good, so good.  

But Joelle knows me like no other, and she organized the desserts, drinks, a few sides, a turkey delivered by Emily and Aaron, cooked and ready for the table at 1pm! And bless her heart, she knew that I would want to cook, so I got to do mash potatoes, that squash dish, stir fried veggies (asparagus, brussels sprouts, and carrots), apple sauce, a green salad, and fresh baked rolls.  

At one moment I was thinking to myself, “if Joelle was here, she would know when to start cooking, and when to start warming.” It all came together beautifully, in large part to my amazing wife and the other talented Klesick cooks! 

That saying about many hands make light work was evident as the crew brought the meal, cleaned up, and boxed up all the leftovers, then it was game time. 

The adult children were at the kitchen table playing a card game and laughing, the grandchildren and younger Klesick children were in the “bonus” room playing and laughing, and I was in the living room, holding the newest Klesick grandson, Bazil, all of 6 weeks old. As I sat there holding another generation, I was struck by how precious life is. In one ear I hear the laughter of my other grandchildren, and in the other ear I hear the hearty laughter of my adult children.  

And there I am, looking at a sleeping little baby, who ties us all together. 4 generations gathered under one roof, laughing, sharing, and living life.  

And 5 hours later, our home was quiet. Thankfully, it won’t be long before the next gathering brings us all together to celebrate and enjoy each other again. 

Tristan                                                                                                                             Farmer/Health Advocate                                                           

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Thanksgiving

This is the foodie holiday of foodie holidays. So much energy is going to be invested with planning, shopping, house cleaning, meal prep, and cooking. A few of you will even have 2 or 3 engagements and you might have to eat turkey TWICE! But before I delve into my plan to eat healthy this Thanksgiving, I wanted to extend a HUGE thank you to our box of good community.  

Over 900 boxes to 12 different food banks donated by our customers this past year. That is incredible. These donations are powerful and convey hope and help the food bank community extend care into many vulnerable populations. 

Thank You – Thank You – Thank You  

Tristan’s plan to eat a successful Thanksgiving Meal  

This week is one of those food “traps” that will be foisted upon Americans. Yep, Thanksgiving, a time to be thankful will be greeted with a barrage of pies, ice cream, jello, lots of gravy, and, and, and. Just the sheer amount of food will be immense, and the selection on most tables will be enough to feed a family for a week.  Most of us are not going to be in control of how much food gets set on the table, but we can control how much food gets put on our plates.  

To be a successful eater at the Thanksgiving table, I would encourage a few Non-Negotiables.   

  • Choose to eat better so you will feel better and not bloated or stuffed. It is a choice.  
  •  Limit snacking and choose the fruit and veggie snacks.
  •  Plan to eat at the main meal, whether that is lunch or dinner for your family, but be reasonable with your portions.
  •  Just one plate, not one plate at a time. Not heaping (wink, wink). Just one plate, it will be enough food.   
  • Remember, dessert will be coming, so pick none or just one. I know this is a hard one, because there will be lots of selection and a sampling will be tough to turn down.

These simple non-negotiables or guidelines will help anyone enjoy family, friends and the Thanksgiving meal with energy and enthusiasm. Imagine feeling full and thankful this Thanksgiving. That’s my goal! 

Tristan                                                                                                                              Farmer/Health Advocate                                                          

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Roasted Acorn Squash Soup

Yield: 4 Servings | Prep Time: 1 Hour 20 Minutes | Source: www.asweetpeachef.com

Ingredients:

  • 3 acorn squashes
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 granny smith apple, cored and chopped
  • 1 shallot, chopped
  • 1/2 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1/2 red onion, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp dried ginger
  • 1/4 tsp dried sage
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 4 cups vegetable stock

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Line baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper.
  3. Lightly sprinkle with kosher salt and ground black pepper. Place squash, cut-side-down, onto baking sheet. Roast in oven for 45-50 minutes, or until flesh is tender and easily pierced. Remove from oven and allow to cool.
  4. Once cool, remove flesh from skin by using a spoon and scooping out the flesh. Discard skin and set flesh aside.
  5. In a large, deep pot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until hot. Add carrots, apple, shallot and onions and sauté until tender, about 6-8 minutes. Once tender, add ginger, sage, cayenne, allspice, squash flesh and vegetable stock. Stir well and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes.
  6. Remove pot from heat and puree mixture, either with an immersion blender (best thing ever), a blender (in batches) or a food processor.
  7. Once pureed, season with any additional salt or pepper to taste. Garnish with thinly sliced red onion or apples, if desired.
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Classic Stuffed Peppers

Yield: 6 Servings | Prep Time: 1 Hour 30 Minutes | Source: www.delish.com

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 c. uncooked rice
  • 2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 1 (14.5-oz.) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 bell peppers, tops and cores removed
  • 1 c. shredded Monterey jack
  • Freshly chopped parsley, for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. In a small saucepan, prepare rice according to package instructions. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat oil. Cook onion until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in tomato paste and garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute more. Add ground beef and cook, breaking up meat with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink, 6 minutes. Drain fat.
  2. Return beef mixture to skillet, then stir in cooked rice and diced tomatoes. Season with oregano, salt, and pepper. Let simmer until liquid has reduced slightly, about 5 minutes.
  3. Place peppers cut side-up in a 9″-x-13″ baking dish and drizzle with oil. Spoon beef mixture into each pepper and top with Monterey jack, then cover baking dish with foil.
  4. Bake until peppers are tender, about 35 minutes. Uncover and bake until cheese is bubbly, 10 minutes more.
  5. Garnish with parsley before serving.
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Only A Few Weeks Left

We have been adding an extra ordering page for the Thanksgiving holiday. We used to routinely include a flyer with every order and then our customers would return it and we make changes, add-ons or vacation skips. It seems that digital communication streamlined most of that communication, but this year we are bringing it back for the next few weeks.  

You can use the form as an actual honest to goodness old fashioned order form. Fill it out and leave it for your driver to pick up on your next delivery. OLD SCHOOL. Or you could fill it out and call us, also OLD SCHOOL. Or you can fill it out and take a picture and EMAIL it to [email protected]’s.com, Not so OLD SCHOOL, or you could take a picture and IM or DM or…. now we are getting techy. You could even go online and just place the order 😊. We are happy to help you get the freshest food for your holiday table, and whichever way works best for you – Have at it! 

We also use this holiday to partner with you to extend a box of good to the less fortunate in our community through our food bank systems. We support 10 food banks with weekly local boxes of good that are donated by you our customers. We call it Neighbors Helping Neighbors, but at Thanksgiving we design a HOLIDAY DONATION box. It is the same box that you are able to order for your thanksgiving meal, but we sell it for $10 less. This is our way of participating in making the holidays a little better for others. 

If you would like to join us as we continue 22 years of donating Holiday Donation boxes, please fill out the form and get it back to us (using one of the methods mentioned above), and we will do the rest. Actually, we will order, assemble, and deliver the freshest organically grown produce to our local community food banks and THE FOOD BANKS WILL EXTEND YOUR KINDNESS TO THOSE LESS FORTUNATE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. 

I love local solutions to local problems, and together we have made a difference and are making a difference. 

Thank you, 

-Tristan

Thanksgiving Delivery Schedule

Note your new delivery day

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Time To Plan

Isn’t it hard to believe that it’s already time to be planning for Thanksgiving? Those of us in the farming and food business have already been planning for this major food holiday, but now it is time to share with you what we are “cooking up” on our end for deliveries. 

Delivery Schedules: 

For the week of Thanksgiving, all deliveries will be happening Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Which means if your normal delivery day is Thursday, Friday or Saturday, your order Thanksgiving week will be before the Holiday. Don’t worry about it now, we will email and communicate the delivery changes well in advance. 

Holiday boxes:  

For the Last 20 years we have been helping families with their Thanksgiving meal planning. This year will be no different, except, we have two ways to order your Thanksgiving items. 

1. You can either order the Holiday Box (with my regular order) or the Holiday Box (replacing my regular order). Either way, the Holiday Box is the same box. But, inevitably, Alaina and the Klesick’s team will be thinking about Holiday box orders that also have your regular boxes still being ordered. Many of you intend to order a holiday box and your regular order and, conversely, many of you intend to only order a holiday box but forget to move your current order out a week. This change in how you order the Holiday Boxes will make it easier on our Klesick’s team to get your order perfect and make sure you get exactly what you ordered. 

2. The Holiday Boxes are available for the weeks of November 11th, 18th, 25th, and December 1st. The Holiday box is a popular box all month. 

3. You can also send a Holiday Donation Box to one of our 10 food banks that we partner with weekly and make this Holiday Season even more nutritious for a family in need. For each donation box purchased, we send out end of year tax receipts. 

4. And as usual, you can order all your Thanksgiving ingredients “a la carte“. 

5. The Holiday Box menu and prices are available below.   

Thank you,

-Tristan 

Farmer/Health Advocate 

Holiday Box Menu:

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Roasted Beet &Citrus Salad

Yield: 6 Servings | Prep Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes | Source: www.healthy-delicious.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound beets
  • 6 cups arugula
  • 2 oranges, segmented
  • 1/4 small red onion, minced
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 limes, juiced
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • sea salt and cracked black pepper

Instructions:

  1. Heat your oven to 450ºF.
  2. Line a baking dish with foil. Add the beets (trim off any leafy greens), then cover tightly with more foil. Roast for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until the beets can be easily pierced with a fork.
  3. Let the beets cool to the touch, then peel and cut into a large dice. Refrigerate until ready to use.
  4. Arrange the arugula over a large serving platter. Top with the beets and oranges.
  5. In a measuring cup, combine the onion, oil, vinegar, lime juice, and cilantro. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the dressing over the salad. Let sit 5 minutes before serving.
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Kitchen Talk

Joelle and I have a rhythm to our cooking. I love to make food and then she loves to make it taste great! She could never work at Panera or IHOP, where the only ingredients seem to be sodium and sugar.  Joelle has a unique ability to discern what is missing, and how much to add or not. I, on the other hand, tend towards lots of veggies and texture and then leave the final pass to Joelle. 

Speaking of the “Pass,” I have been watching the Netflix show called The Chef’s Line. In this series, there are 4 home cooks who cook against a restaurant’s team of chefs.  Each series features a different culture, and the home cooks are either from that culture, or love to cook that cultures food. I don’t have a significant amount of time to watch shows, but these 22-minute episodes are a nice break to decompress and get inspired at the same time. 

I would never qualify as a home cook on this show, because I love to cook all the cultures from Indian, to Italian, to Vegan (smile), to Mexican. It sort of belies the fact that American cuisine is truly a melting pot of cultures and flavors and, well…there really isn’t any one thing that I gravitate towards. I just love to cook them all and eat it. 

I do gravitate towards simple cooking, and I usually make 6 to 9 loaves of sourdough bread a week. I recently added flour tortillas to my rotation (I hate all that plastic that comes with purchasing flour tortillas). I love to bake sourdough bread. It is an unsophisticated art, where the results vary, and the outcome is always devoured. Last night, I set out my starter and fed it. Then, at 5am, I mix 200 grams of starter with 1000 grams of water and 1200 grams of flour, mix all of them together, let it set for 30 minutes, add 24 grams of salt and mix again. 

Flour is where I do become a local-vore. At our farm we sell Cairnspring Flours, and I exclusively bake with all local flours from Skagit county. I want to see local flours with regional integrity and flavors make a comeback. Cairnspring Mills is the connection to incredible flavor, and locally sourced nutrition. 

But I digress. After shaping bread and heading off to a Volleyball match in Snohomish, I called ahead on our way home and asked Joelle to heat up the oven to 450 degrees so I could bake off a loaf. And, much to my surprise and delight, our evening fire had burned down to coals, and the upper bake oven was at 475 degrees. That is a perfect temperature to bake bread, so I slid another loaf into the fireplace oven and will be taking them out at about the time I finish this newsletter, 45 minutes later. 

Tonight’s bread will truly embody the definition of hearth baked bread! And, as a side benefit, since all the kiddos are off to bed, the bread has a chance to cool down and last longer than 25 minutes before it is devoured! Okay, as much as I want the bread to last a little longer, it is satisfying when your family is eagerly waiting for several slices of fresh, out of the oven, baked bread!  

Time to go! The timer is beeping! 

-Tristan