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How do I pay for my order?

Klesick Family Farm currently accepts five methods of payment:

1. Direct charge of a debit/credit card

2. Paying by check on delivery

3. Check or money order delivered through the U.S. Postal Service

4. Bill pay through your banking institution

5. Prepayment

1. Debit/Credit Card

Customers that choose to pay by debit/credit card will be asked to file the following information:

Card type

Card number

Expiration date

Name on card

Billing zip code

For your security and assurance, Klesick Family Farm meets the Visa/MasterCard Cardholder Information Security Program (CISP) Standard.

Debit/credit cards are processed the first business day following delivery. At that time, your card will be charged the full balance due on your account.

In the event that debit/credit charges are declined when payment is due, service may be suspended until payment is successfully processed or other payment arrangements are made.

2. Check on Delivery

For your first delivery, please place your check in an envelope addressed to Klesick Family Farm and affix it to your front door (if you prefer a different location just let us know). Your Home Delivery Driver will take your payment and leave your order.

For subsequent deliveries, please place your payment inside the empty produce box and leave it next to your front door (unless you have arranged a different delivery location). Your Home Delivery Driver will take both the payment and the empty box and leave your new order.

Please make checks payable to: Klesick Family Farm. Please include your customer number in the memo section (the customer number is the 8 character code found on your invoice (for example, KLES5350).

Klesick Family Farm requires that customers provide payment with each delivery. If payment is not received on or before your next scheduled delivery, service may be suspended until payment is successfully processed or other payment arrangements are made.

3. Check or Money Order Delivered through the US Postal Service

Klesick Family Farm accepts payments received through the US Postal Service. Checks or money orders can be mailed to the following address:

Klesick Family Farm

18826 Marine Drive

Stanwood, WA 98292

Please make checks or money orders payable to: Klesick Family Farm. Please include your customer number in the memo section (the customer number is the 8 character code found on your invoice (for example, KLES5350).

Klesick Family Farm requires that customers provide payment with each delivery. If payment is not received on or before your next scheduled delivery, service may be suspended until payment is successfully processed or other payment arrangements are made.

4. Bill Pay through Your Banking Institution

Klesick Family Farm accepts payments received through Bill Pay services. Checks processed through bill pay services can be mailed to the following address:

Klesick Family Farm

18826 Marine Drive

Stanwood, WA 98292

Please make checks payable to: Klesick Family Farm. Please include your customer number in the memo section (the customer number is the 8 character code found on your invoice (for example, KLES5350).

Klesick Family Farm requires that customers provide payment with each delivery. If payment is not received on or before your next scheduled delivery, service may be suspended until payment is successfully processed or other payment arrangements are made.

5. Prepayment

Customers wishing to prepay for produce deliveries should contact the office at 360.652.GOOD (4663) or toll free at 866.629.5350 to set up a payment/delivery schedule.

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Is there a delivery fee?

There is no delivery fee if your order includes one of our standard boxes of produce. The cost of delivery is included in the price of each box. Non-box orders will incur an additional $3.50 delivery fee.

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What are your delivery areas and delivery days?

Tuesday:

Everett, Mukilteo, Silver Firs, Mill Creek

Wednesday:

Anacortes, Bothell, Woodinville (limited), Snohomish, Monroe

Thursday:

Marysville (south of 100th St NE), Lake Stevens, Harbour Pointe, Lynnwood, Alderwood Manor, Edmonds, Mountlake Terrace, Brier

Friday:

Arlington, North Marysville, Tulalip, Kayak Point, Warm Beach, Camano Island, Stanwood, Lake Goodwin, Mount Vernon, Burlington, Big Lake (north end), Sedro-Woolley

 

 

 

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Salade Nicoise

My favorite way to enjoy the albacore tuna is on this salad!

Four servings


1 six-ounce can troll-caught albacore in juices
2-3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil or 1 tablespoon dried
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, chopped
1 small head green leaf lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
2 large tomatoes, cut into wedges
1 green pepper, cut into strips
1/2 cucumber, peeled sliced
3-5 radishes, trimmed, sliced
2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
6 drained canned anchovy fillets (optional, I don’t usually use them)
8 black olives (preferably brine-cured)
2 green onions, chopped

Flake undrained albacore with a fork; add the additional 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil and whisk with basil, lemon juice, and chopped garlic. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper. Arrange bed of lettuce on large platter. Top decoratively with remaining ingredients. Drizzle enough dressing over to moisten. Serve, passing remaining dressing separately.

This is amazing with a thick buttered slice of Breadfarm’s Blanchard Black Olive Baguette! Make extra dressing and dip the baguette in it…yum!

-Marty, for the Klesick Family Farm



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Salmon Safe Certification

We’ve renewed our Salmon-Safe Certification!

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This means that Klesick is:

  • Maintaining a buffer of trees and vegetation along the stream banks
  • Controlling erosion by cover cropping bare soil
  • Improving the passage for migrating fish
  • Applying natural methods to control weeds and farm pests
  • Using efficient and non-wasteful irrigation practices
  • Protecting wetlands, woodlands, and other natural areas
  • Promoting on-farm plant and wildlife diversity

Learn more about Salmon-Safe on Stewardship Partner’s website.



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Fresh This Week Tips, June 6, 2010

Orange Honeydew

image from www.specialtyproduce.com

STORE: Store your honeydew melon on the countertop for 2-4 days until ripe. A perfectly ripe honeydew will yield just a bit to pressure at the blossom end and smell sweet like honey.  Once ripe, store it whole in the refrigerator for 5-7 days.
PREP: Wash your honeydew melon before slicing and gently scoop out the seeds. Then, cut into wedges or cube. You can also use a melon baller to make things more interesting!
USE: For tips on using your honeydew, see this week’s Know Your Produce Spotlight.

Peaches

image from oncetherewerelions.files.wordpress.com

STORE: Ripen peaches in a paper bag with the top folded over. Store your peaches on the countertop until ripe. A ripe peach will be firm but give way to pressure and will have a delicious “peachy” fragrance. Store ripe peaches in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
PREP: Take peaches out of the refrigerator 2 hours before eating and wash thoroughly. Pit peaches easily by cutting along the seam all the way through the fruit down to the pit and twist in opposite directions. You can also slice or dice your peaches. To skin peaches, cut an X on the bottom of the peach and blanch. Remember, your cut peaches will discolor quickly so toss them with lemon juice after cutting.
USE: Peaches, one of the quintessential summer fruits, is delicious in pies, cobblers, jams, smoothies, salsas and salads. On a summery day, grill your peaches by pitting them, and slicing them in half or into wedges. Then brush the peaches with canola oil and cook over a medium flame until tender. Serve as a side dish or topping on a salad.

Spinach


image from vindicatethevegetable.wordpress.com

STORE: Remove the twist-tie that holds your bunch of spinach together and store fresh, unwashed spinach loosely packed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper for about five days.
PREP: Wash thoroughly by swishing leaves in a bowl full of tepid water and repeat until clean. Dry with paper towels or in a salad spinner.
USE: Boil spinach for one minute to bring out the flavor or simply keep raw. Make a delicious Strawberry & Spinach salad or Sephardic Spinach Patties. You can also add spinach to smoothies, add layers of steamed spinach to lasagna or simply saute with a little olive oil, garlic and a pinch of salt.

Beefsteak Tomatoes


image from www.eurofresh.com

STORE: Store unripe tomatoes in a paper bag until ripe. Store ripe tomatoes in a cool place for up to 5 days. Do not store tomatoes in the refrigerator as it causes them to lose their flavor and become bland tasting.
PREP: Wash tomatoes in cold water before use. Slice tomatoes vertically with a sharp, preferably serrated knife for salads and sandwiches to prevent the juice and seeds spilling out. For stuffed tomatoes, cut horizontally and remove the seeds and juice.To peel your tomatoes, cut an X on the bottom of each tomato and blanch.
USE: Beefsteak tomatoes are perfect for sandwiches and hamburgers as well as in salads or salsa . You can broil, grill or stuff them. For a tasty summer salad, make Caprese. Arrange slices of beefsteak tomato and fresh mozzarella on a platter and drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and top with a few basil leaves and freshly ground black pepper and sea salt.

Cauliflower

image from www.twincityfrozenfoods.com

STORE: Store for up to one week in your crisper covered by a plastic or paper bag.
PREP: Keep whole and chop of ¼ inch off the stem or cut the head into bite-sized florets.
USE: Steam, roast, bake or stir fry cauliflower. Be careful not to overcook!  For a simple, delicious pizza, try this pizza with cauliflower crust recommended by a customer (great for those eating gluten free). 

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Know Your Food: Sweet Creek Albacore Tuna

You are probably concerned or maybe just curious about the tuna we have begun offering. Wondering why is it different from any other “canned tuna” you would buy in the grocery store? And right you are to wonder!

More and more, consumers are beginning to show interest, or even concern about where their food comes from. Recent films like “Food, Inc.” and “Fresh” have got us thinking and taking action about our food: where and who it comes from, how it is raised and harvested. With the concerns about mercury levels in fish, and the dangers over-fishing, you may be wondering, is it safe for me to be eating tuna? We know fish such as tuna, salmon, rainbow trout, sardines, Atlantic mackerel, and herring are very rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins A & D and other nutrients so important to healthy brain and body function.

These fish have particular, natural fatty acids – the main component of fat – not found in any other foods. These fatty acids are missing many hydrogen atoms so they are highly polyunsaturated, more so than other polyunsaturated fatty acids in food. Also, they are longer than most other fatty acids. These structural differences give fish oil fatty acids their unique health properties. They are called “omega-3” fatty acids because of the location of the first two missing hydrogens in their chemical structure. The two main omega-3 fatty acids in fish oils are called EPA* and DHA* for short. EPA and DHA occur naturally only in seafood, and are abundant only in fatty fish and marine animals.

* EPA: eicosapentaenoic acid; DHA: docosahexaenoic acid

The tuna we sell comes in a glass jar from a small Oregon company called Sweet Creek Foods. Sweet Creek is a small family business owned and operated by Paul and Julie Fuller.  They hand pack each jar using the finest loins from troll-caught tuna. Their tuna is cooked only once, insuring lots of heart friendly omega 3 oils. They are proud to guarantee this is some of the highest quality tuna that you’ll ever eat. It’s great to use in salads, sandwiches, casseroles or just eat it straight from the jar.  In reality you are getting a lot more quality fish in each jar than what comes in most cans from the supermarket, because trim, extra water and sodium is included in the tuna from large canneries. Sweet Creek’s tuna is cooked only once in its own natural juices (think nutrient-rich broth).

Sweet Creek catches the smaller tuna (between 10-20 lbs. usually, compared to the big companies who go for the 30-60+ lb tuna. These smaller fish have much lower levels of mercury as they haven’t been in the ocean so long. OSU Mercury test report results indicate that “Pacific troll-caught albacore have low levels of total mercury in the edible flesh and are well within international safety standards for mercury levels in fish.” Support your local Oregon fishermen in their dedication to this sustainable, hand caught, hook and line fishery. Environmental seafood guides produced by Audubon and the Monterey Bay Aquarium have cited the albacore troll fishery as an example of a clean fishery with little bycatch or impact on the environment. Albacore are very sensitive to water temperature, and few other fish off Oregon are found in those water temperatures, so the bycatch is low.

A great resource to check out is the Oregon Albacore Commission’s web site: http://www.oregonalbacore.org/index.htm. It contains all the info on their line-caught tuna…and recipes!
Sweet Creek’s website: http://www.sweetcreekfoods.com/products/tuna.html

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Acid and Alkaline Diet

Spring is here, the weather is warmer and probably the most asked question I get is, “How can I lose weight?” or “Which diet works?” When thinking about losing weight, it’s not always the decreased number on the scale that we are looking for. It is the way it makes us feel: the increased energy, the lithe movements, how our clothes fit and our skin feels. It is not simply the weight but the health too! With so many diets in the media now, how do you know which is the best choice for you?

Well, “diets” never work because they eventually end and we go back to eating the same bad food choice s. When considering weight, health and all those good feelings, a “lifestyle change” is most important. These choices can really vary too, so in my next few articles I will walk you through some interesting diet choices that you may have never thought of.

Acid and Alkaline Balance Diet.  The goal of this diet is to help your body maintain a healthy pH level for all organs and systems to function optimally. This is an interesting theory that I have struggled to understand for years. Many Acid/Alkaline advocates believe that this diet will cure all kinds of diseases. I’m a little more skeptical on that part. We are too complex of a system for it to be that simple. It is imperative, however, that our body maintain its pH; otherwise, cells die…we die. So how could a diet help when our body has so many checks and balances to stabilize pH on its own? Well, some of those checks and balances are dependent on minerals. Where do we get minerals? Our bones, muscles, teeth or our food. If our food isn’t balanced then our body steals what it needs from other areas (bones, muscles and teeth) to correct the imbalance in the blood. So you can see, our health can really decline if our body has to work hard to compensate for our poor food choices.

All foods have acid and alkaline forming properties. Again, it is the balance within that food or meal that matters. Foods that cause an overly acidic condition are foods high in animal fats, animal proteins, sugar and refined grains like white flour products and white rice. Artificial chemicals, flavorings and additives can also create an acidic condition. Foods that increase an alkaline condition are fruits, vegetables and organic whole or sprouted grains. This can be confused with healthy foods that are acidic themselves. Citrus, kiwi and bell peppers contain acids and can be irritating to an ulcer but they create an alkaline condition when absorbed by the body because of other beneficial nutrients. Coffee, alcohol and sugar…well, they are acidic to an ulcer and your body.

Generally, alkaline-forming foods should make up at least 75% of our diet to maintain optimal health. There are many lists available in books and on the internet if you are interested in a further look. My thoughts: alkaline foods are healthy choices, high in nutrients and low in calories, and are non-inflammatory foods. It may be worth a try.

Stay tuned for the next article on the Raw Foods Diet. 

by Rebecca Dirks, N.D.
Associate Physician, NW Center for Optimal Health
Marysville, 360-651-9355
Producer & Co-Host, Healthy Living, KSER FM 90.7