Posted on

Delicata

This week we are featuring Delicata Squash and, oh what a crop we have had! This might have been one of the top two or three growing seasons!  

I love that…by just eating fruits and vegetables our bodies can get an incredible amount of nutrition and phytochemicals. Delicata and all winter squash are nutritional powerhouses! Low in Calories, low on the Glycemic Index and high in everything important. If Americans would just commit to getting enough daily fiber in their diets from plants, we would avert the looming health crisis of diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, cancer, obesity. Just using the goal of 30grams of fiber a day you would also tap into a plethora of phytochemicals, minerals, and vitamins that also nourish and heal our bodies. 

Just look at the nutritional profile for winter squash and this is only 1 cup and only 1 item in your box of good this week. Organic fruits and vegetables are super foods, super healthy and super tasty!  

Enjoy! 

Tristan 

Your Farmer and Health Advocate 

 

 

DELICATA, APPLE AND GREENS SALAD 

Serves 4 

INGREDIENTS 

1 delicata squash, seeds removed and cut into chunks (½”x1”)

2 small apples, largely diced  

1 carrot, grated
1 teaspoon fresh thyme, or ½ tsp dried thyme ⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 cups of Lettuce, Spinach, Cabbage or Kale or a mix of all them
The juice of 1 lemon
3 Tablespoons tahini

2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon maple syrup
¼ cup pumpkin seeds
½ cup pomegranate seeds
1 avocado, diced 

DIRECTIONS 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Add cut delicata squash and apple to baking tray (optional – line a large baking dish with parchment paper) and drizzle with Olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt, black pepper, and nutmeg. Use your hands to fully coat squash and apples. Roast for 20 minutes or easily pierced with a knife/fork.  

While delicata and apple are roasting, combine lemon juice, tahini, olive oil and maple syrup together. Drizzle the mixture on the salad ingredients (lettuce, cabbage, kales, spinach, carrot, etc) in a large bowl.  

Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper to taste. Use your hands to gently work in the liquids into salad mix for a minute or two – a little less for lettuce and a litt

le more for kale and cabbage. 

Add pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds, and diced avocado to the salad mix. Top with roasted apple and delicata squash and mix once more. Enjoy! 

Posted on

How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 8/19/18)

Apples:
Apples are one of those quintessential healthy eating choices! You can dice them up and throw them into your hot cereal with some cinnamon for a fresh take on breakfast, toss them in smoothies, slice them atop green salads to sweeten them up and add texture, dip them in nut butter or yogurt for a snack, roast with savory fall veggies, bake with a topping of your favorite granola…so many ways to enjoy them! And perhaps the best part? Antioxidants and phytochemicals in apples have been linked to help prevent a number of chronic diseases, including: Alzheimer’s, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes and more. Store unwashed apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Be sure to store separately. See healthline.com for more nutrition information on Apples!

Green Beans:
Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Frisée

You’ve no doubt seen frisée before, perhaps without realizing it, tucked away inside a mesclun baby greens mix. Also called curly endive, the curly, pale green leaves are frizzy in appearance. Frisée is a variety of chicory, as you’ll be clued in to with the first solo bite: it’s one of those bitters we were talking about in last week’s newsletter. Store: in the fridge for up to five days (rinse first), in plastic or other non-breathable material, so it doesn’t wilt. Use: most often served fresh in salads, try it wilted or sautéed to mellow its bitterness. Frisée pairs well with flavor-packed ingredients and fats: Dress leaves with a warm vinaigrette of roast-chicken pan drippings and sherry or red wine vinegar, toss in browned bits of thick-cut pancetta, ham, or steak bits, or top with a poached or fried egg.

 

Featured Recipe: Farmer’s Market Salad

This dish combines all of those wonderful summer veggies with a creamy, yet light, dressing that is full of flavor. This version has cooked chicken, but this salad can certainly be served on its own. Likewise, feel free to swap in your favorite vegan dressing if dairy isn’t in your diet. Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

2 medium (about 1 lb.) summer squashes (zucchini, yellow crookneck), sliced thin

1 bell pepper, sliced

2 cups tomatoes cut into 1-inch pieces

2 cups frisée, chopped

½ cup green onions, sliced

1 ear fresh corn, off the cob or 1 cup

6” length of cucumber, sliced

2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded or sliced, this would be 3/4 uncooked boneless chicken breast

DRESSING:

1/3 cup buttermilk

1/3 cup soy-free mayonnaise

1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon lime juice

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

If you are starting with uncooked boneless chicken breast, preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Brush the chicken with olive oil on both sides and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish and roast for 15-20 minutes until cooked though. The internal temperature should be 165 degrees.

Let cool and either slice into thin strips or shred with a fork.

In a large bowl combine the summer squash, bell pepper, tomatoes, frisée, green onions, corn, cucumber, and shredded chicken.

In a small bowl combine the buttermilk, mayonnaise, Greek yogurt, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the salad. Combine well. Serve at once.

 

Recipe adapted from anothertablespoon.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/5/18)

Melons, Cantaloupe      

Cantaloupe provide a range of antioxidants, phytonutrients, and electrolytes which have been shown to have multiple health benefits. Two types of powerful antioxidants in cantaloupe (carotenoids and cucurbitacins) have been linked with the prevention of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. They help to stop free radical damage within the body and slow the aging process. —dr.axe.dom

Storage and Eating: They may look hardy, but melons can perish quickly if not kept in the refrigerator. Keep ripe melons away from other fruit so that the ethylene gas that they produce does not speed up the fruit’s ripening. Uncut ripe melons should keep in the fridge for up to 5 days. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out ripe fruit and then freeze to add to smoothies.

Green Cabbage

Cabbage has the highest amount of some of the most powerful antioxidants found in cruciferous vegetables – phytonutrients such as thiocyanates, lutein, zeaxanthin, isothiocyanates, and sulforaphane, which stimulate detoxifying enzymes. Research has shown these compounds to protect against several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancers. They also help lower the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) or “bad cholesterol” levels in blood, which can build up in arteries and cause heart disease. —foodfacts.mercola.com

Eat it: Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. There are endless opportunities to use it up. You can add it to “just about anything” veggie-wise. Make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Featured Recipe: Cabbage Salad

This delicious, filling comes from the one by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. This combination of greens, seeds and currants will fill you up quickly and keep you full.

Ingredients:

3 ½ cups green cabbage, grated (approx. ½ cabbage)

1 carrot, peeled and grated

1 red pepper, thinly sliced

1/4 cup dried currants or cranberries

2 tbsp raw pumpkin seeds

2 tbsp raw sunflower seeds

1 tbsp unhulled sesame seeds

For dressing:

1/3 cup almond or hemp milk

1 apple, peeled and sliced

1/2 cup raw cashews

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Instructions:

Mix all salad ingredients together.

In a high-powered blender, blend almond/hemp milk, apple, cashews and vinegar and toss with salad.

Garnish with currants and lightly toasted sesame seeds.

Recipe adapted from Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/29/18)


plumsPlums

Your plums will continue to ripen once off the tree. Simply leave them on the counter away from the sun. When ripe, store unwrapped in the refrigerator for up to three days. If stored in the refrigerator, remove your plums (same goes for pluots) before eating and let them return to room temperature. They taste much better this way. Rinse and leave whole, slice into wedges or cut into chunks. Use them as a fresh topping for yogurt, dehydrated for fruit snacks or make into jam.

Roma Tomatoes

Store tomatoes in a single layer at room temperature and away from direct light. Refrigerate only after slicing, as refrigeration makes tomatoes lose their flavor. Romas are great for cooking (especially soups and sauces) as they don’t have the seeds and excess water that many other tomatoes tend to come with. You can also eat them raw, roasted, fried, or broiled; they are great paired with a little olive oil and salt, herbs such as basil and cilantro, and fresh cheeses such as mozzarella and ricotta. And yes, you can totally freeze those extra tomatoes for fresh flavor all year (slice first).

Featured Recipe : Niçoise Salad with Frisée

“This salad from the South of France is a meal on its own and you vary endlessly with the ingredients. This one is made with Frisée which adds a slightly bitter touch. A perfect companion to the other ingredients of the Niçoise like green beans, tomatoes and anchovies.” — lovemysalad.com

Check out more great info on Frisee from the front page of this week’s newsletter, HERE.

Ingredients:

1 Frisée lettuce

2-3 Roma tomatoes, diced

3-4 whole green onions, roots removed, sliced into thin rings

0.75 lb. green beans or haricot verts

handful of black olives such as Kalamata

4 hardboiled eggs

2 cans of tuna in oil, drained (feel free change this up: top with smoked or baked salmon instead)

8 anchovy fillets in oil, drained

1 can of artichoke hearts, drained

Instructions:

Put a large pan of salted water on medium high heat. Rinse the green beans and cut of the stem of each bean.

When the water boils add the green beans and cook them just until al dente. Rinse with cold water and let them cool.

Wash and dry the frisée and divide over 4 plates. Cut the tomatoes and eggs in wedges.

Divide onion, cooled green beans, artichoke hearts, olives and eggs over the frisée.

Prepare the dressing by mixing the olive oil, red wine vinegar, lemon juice and crushed garlic. Add sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste and divide the dressing over the salad.

Divide the tuna (or salmon) chunks and anchovy fillets over the plates and serve with a lemon wedge.

 

Recipe adapted from lovemysalad.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/15/18)

Kohlrabi

Mike (our customer caretaker) is Kohlrabi’s biggest fan so if you need some convincing to try this alien-like vegetable, give him a call;) Kohlrabi is typically eaten raw—peeled, sliced and added to a salad or used for serving with a dip. You can also steam, boil, bake, grill, or roast them. Just peel away the outside thick skin first. Add them to soups or stews. Try grating them and toss with grated carrots or apples to make a slaw!

You can also boil and mash them with potatoes or other root vegetables. Stir-fry them with other vegetables, or julienne them and fry them like potatoes. Look for Indian recipes using kohlrabi as they are often used in Indian cuisine.

Peaches

Test for ripeness by fragrance and by gently pressing around the stem – it should give to light pressure when ripe. Place in sealed container in the fridge when ripe – if you leave them exposed to the open air in the fridge, they will wrinkle from dehydration. Peaches, like other stonefruit, ripen from the inside to the outside, so if fruit is soft all over it is more likely overripe. Try peaches for breakfast paired with yogurt or hot/cold cereal, as a topping to a green salad, and as an ingredient in fruit salads. Peaches are also great on the grill, but be sure to use slightly less ripe fruit, it will hold up better without breaking apart/juicing. And of course, peaches bake up fabulously into crisps, pies, and sauces!

 

Featured Recipe: Kohlrabi, Carrot and Lettuce Slaw

A fresh slaw made with kohlrabi, lettuce and carrot, perfect as a side dish or a light lunch.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 large kohlrabi bulbs peeled

2 large carrots peeled

2 cups finely chopped lettuce or combination of lettuce and kale

handful chopped green onion (or diced sweet onion)

1 cup almonds chopped

1 lemon juice retained

salt and black pepper to season

3 tablespoons sesame seeds

your choice of dressing

Instructions:

Grate both the kohlrabi and carrot roughly in a large mixing bowl.

Add the lettuce and toss to mix.

Add the green onion, almonds, lemon juice, seasoning and sesame seeds. Mix well.

Serve your salad with your choice of dressing.

RECIPE NOTES

Great as a light lunch, and quick to prepare as a side dish with your main dish.

Recipe adapted from aninas-recipes.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 3/18/18)

Blood Oranges:

With ruby-red to maroon-colored flesh, blood oranges are a surprise when you cut them open; taste-wise, they’re tart-sweet and slightly berry-like.

Storage tips: To keep these ruby gems fresh longer, choose refrigeration over the fruit bowl―they’ll only last only a couple of days at room temperature, but up to two weeks in the fridge.

How to eat them: Blood oranges are best eaten fresh―out of hand, or in salads, salsas, or marmalades. If you’re following a recipe you may be asked to section the fruit. To do so, peel the orange, cut between the white membranes to expose the flesh, and remove the sections (for more juice, squeeze the leftover membranes).

Health benefits: Oranges are rich in antioxidants―vital for healthy cells―including vitamin C, which aids in healing, boosts your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and even helps reduce the risk of cancer. This citrus fruit is also a good source of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and, like vitamin C, reduce your cancer risk. (To maximize your fiber intake, be sure to eat some of the spongy white pith right under the skin.)

 

 

Mangos:

To peel a mango: using the tip of the mango as a guide, slice the two cheeks of the mango off, cutting around the stone in the center. Then place the edge of the mango against the lip of a glass and slide it down one of the halves, so that you’re using the glass like a giant spoon to scrape the mango from its skin. If your mango is ripe (yields to soft pressure, fragrant), you can get the glass to slide through it and separate the skin with ease. If you want to get the part around the pit, we advise going at it with a paring knife, or if you have a toddler, this will keep them busy for a while. Then, you can eat the half of mango, or, if you’re sharing, slice it up, cut it into cubes, and dump into a bowl, ready to serve!

 

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese.

Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

 

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or salad, but can also be used to liven up your Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. You can even grill them whole like spring onions and serve as a side dish with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Yams

Serves 4

Ingredients:

 

2 large yams

1 tablespoon honey

1-2 teaspoons crushed red-pepper flakes (or to taste)

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup plain Greek-style yogurt

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice, approximately 2 limes

2 green onions, both green and white parts, trimmed and thinly sliced, for garnish

Instructions:

Heat oven to 425. Cut the yams lengthwise into 4 wedges per yam. Put them in a large bowl, and toss them with the honey, ½ tablespoon of the crushed red-pepper flakes, the smoked paprika and 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Let it sit for 10 minutes or so, tossing once or twice to coat, as the oven heats.

Transfer the yams to a foil-lined, rimmed baking sheet, season with salt and pepper and then bake until they are deeply caramelized around the edges and soft when pierced with a fork at their thickest part, approximately 30 to 35 minutes.

As the yams roast, combine the yogurt, lime juice and remaining tablespoon of olive oil in a small bowl, and whisk to combine, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

When the yams are done, transfer them to a serving platter, drizzle the yogurt over them and garnish with the remaining pepper flakes, the green onions and some flaky sea salt.

 

Adapted from recipe by cooking.nytimes.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 2/5/8)

Mangos:

Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or salsa. Try adding mango to fried rice—we think it’s pretty amazing. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated or made into fruit leather snacks, or peel, slice and freeze to add to smoothies.

To peel a mango: using the tip of the mango as a guide, slice the two cheeks of the mango off, cutting around the stone in the center. Then place the edge of the mango against the lip of a glass and slide it down one of the halves, so that you’re using the glass like a giant spoon to scrape the mango from its skin. If your mango is ripe (yields to soft pressure, fragrant), you can get the glass to slide through it and separate the skin with ease. If you want to get the part around the pit, we advise going at it with a paring knife, or if you have a toddler, handing it over to them (the pit, not the knife!) will keep them busy for a while. Then, you can eat the half of mango, or, if you’re sharing, slice it up, cut it into cubes, and dump into a bowl, ready to serve!

 

Pears, d’Anjou:

The d’Anjou is a truly all-purpose pear. They are juicy when ripe, and their subtle sweetness hints at a refreshing lemon-lime flavor. Their dense flesh holds up well in heated applications like baking, poaching, roasting, or grilling and they are delicious when sliced fresh in salads or eaten as an out-of-hand snack. The most important thing to know about d’Anjou pears is that they do not change color as they ripen, unlike Bartletts, whose skin color changes to yellow during ripening. Check the neck for ripeness by gently pressing your thumb near the stem end of the pear. When it gives slightly, the pear is ripe.

 

Artichokes:

Artichokes can be steamed, boiled, baked or grilled. To bake, cut about an inch off the top and stem of the artichoke. Then cut it in half and remove the fuzzy part in the center with a spoon. Rub the cut side with a half a lemon, squeezing some juice into the fold and the middle. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper and freshly minced garlic. Bake on a cookie sheet for about 25 minutes at 425°. Melted butter or mayonnaise mixed with a little balsamic vinegar is commonly used for a dip but you can be creative and use whatever your taste buds desire!           

    

Roma Tomatoes:

Store tomatoes in a single layer at room temperature and away from direct light. Refrigerate only after cutting, as refrigeration makes tomatoes lose their flavor. Romas are great for cooking (especially soups and sauces) as they don’t have the seeds and excess water that many other tomatoes tend to come with. You can also eat them raw, roasted, fried, or broiled; they are great paired with a little olive oil and salt, herbs such as basil and cilantro, and fresh cheeses such as mozzarella and ricotta. And yes, you can totally freeze those extra tomatoes for fresh flavor all year (slice first). According to studies done at Cornell University, cooking tomatoes actually increases the lycopene content that can be absorbed in the body as well as the total antioxidant activity.

 

Featured Recipe: Quinoa & Bell Pepper Salad

Servings: 6 cups

Ingredients:

For 2/3 cup quinoa*

1 1/3 cups water

5 cups romaine lettuce leaves

1 avocado pitted and diced

2/3 cup chopped cucumber

2/3 cup various (mixture of red, yellow, orange) bell pepper strips

1/3 cup chopped red onion

1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese 

Dressing:

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions:

Bring the quinoa and 1 1/3 cup water to a boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the quinoa is tender, and the water has been absorbed, about 15 to 20 minutes. Cool.

Top lettuce with quinoa, avocado, cucumber, bell pepper, red onion, and feta cheese.

Whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, sea salt, and black pepper.  Pour dressing (or toss) over salad right before serving.

*Feel free to substitute the quinoa with cauliflower rice if desired.        

 

                                                                                                                                                                                       

Adapted from recipe by thegirlwhoateeverything.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 1/14/2018)

 Cara Cara Navel Oranges:

Their pinkish orange flesh is reminiscent of grapefruit, but their taste is sweeter and softly tropical. It is believed that Cara Cara’s are a result of a Washington navel crossed with the Brazillian Bahia. Subtle tastes of cherry, rose petal and cranberry is enough to brighten a dreary day and make a salad of avocado and feta quite special. Try it!

Health benefits: Oranges are rich in antioxidants―vital for healthy cells―including vitamin C, which aids in healing, boosts your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and even helps reduce the risk of cancer. This citrus fruit is also a good source of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and, like vitamin C, reduce your cancer risk. (To maximize your fiber intake, be sure to eat some of the spongy white pith right under the skin.)

Lettuce/Greens:

The key to keeping greens fresh is to pre-wash, dry and store them. Try to wash your greens the same day that your box of good is delivered. Try to make sure when you’re unpacking your box to set the lettuce and any other greens on the kitchen counter, so you don’t forget to wash them.

First off, fill a large bowl with some cold water and swirl the leaves around to get rid of the excess dirt. When washing kale, de-stem it as you’re washing it. That will save you time when it comes to throwing that kale salad together. Place in salad spinner, give the spinner a whirl, and spin until your greens are dry.

Wrap greens up in a paper towel or clean cotton kitchen cloth. Make sure to wrap the leaves up gently but tightly, a lot like you would a sleeping bag.

Place the wrapped lettuce inside sealed plastic bags and store in your crisper drawer. The lettuce should stay good for about a week to two weeks, though you should always eat ‘em sooner!

Now that you have some freshly washed greens, you can make some amazing salads on the fly. Here’s to eating more greens!

Arugula:

This peppery green is ubiquitous with fresh salads (try it with blue cheese, walnuts and Asian or Bosc pears), but it is also great atop pizzas (add just after you remove them from the oven, and allow to wilt slightly), or to wilt atop a winter soup. Store in the refrigerator and use within 3-4 days to prevent from becoming bitter.

 

 

Featured Recipe:  Power Salad

Total time: under 15 minutes. Serves 2.

Ingredients:

 

1 teaspoon olive oil

1-2 tablespoons lemon juice

pinch of salt

Generous handful of fresh butter lettuce leaves, cleaned and gently torn

Generous handful of fresh arugula

1 small handful of thinly sliced chard

1/4 cup diced red pepper

1/2 cup toasted pumpkin seeds or pepitas

1 Cara Cara orange, sliced into segments

2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

4 ounces of sliced grilled chicken

 

Instructions:

  1. Combine In a medium bowl first whisk the olive oil, lemon juice, and salt together. Add the lettuce, arugula, and chard and toss them in the dressing. Top with the red pepper, pumpkin seeds, orange segments, grilled chicken, and feta. Optional, top with a dollop of Hope original hummus.

 

adapted from recipe by girlgonegourmet.com

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/5/17)

Kale:

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it can be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. To prevent that, first, make sure to make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry or soup stock!); chop the leaves small; sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and ensures it’s evenly covered. For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne (or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

Posted on

How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 9/24/17)

Conference Pears:

As with all new crop pears, these will need to be ripened for 4-7 days before they are ready to eat. Check the neck for ripeness by gently pressing your thumb near the stem end of the pear. When it gives slightly, the pear is ripe.

Leeks:

Besides potato leek soup (recipe below), there are other delicious ways to eat leeks. Used as an onion swap they make a great base in just about anything. Cook in a little oil until tender as a base for a sauce, sauté, scrambled eggs, soup, etc. The flavor is milder than an onion so I don’t mind having larger chunks. I like to cut them into quarter inch rounds. Leeks are cousins to the old, familiar onion, but have a sweeter, more delicate flavor reminiscent of garlic or chives and are delicious no matter how they’re cooked. Additionally, leeks contain generous amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making the vegetable a great addition to a healthy diet. You can cook leeks by poaching them in chicken broth, pan-frying them in a little oil, or boiling them until tender.

Potatoes:

Packed with nutrition, potatoes are among the most popular of all the root vegetables. Low in fat and high in health and beauty-promoting dietary fiber, potatoes are a rich source of B vitamins as well as vitamin C, and vitamin K. Potatoes are an excellent source of healthy, energy-giving complex carbohydrates, and contain good amounts of certain essential minerals like iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, copper and potassium. Be sure to store potatoes in a cool dark place so they don’t develop green spots (from exposure to light) or sprout.

 

Simple Potato Leek Soup

You will be able to make this simple soup in no time flat, and can feel good about filling up your belly with healthful ingredients!

Ingredients:


2-3 large leeks, white and light green parts only

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons butter

4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped

Kosher salt

6 medium-to-large potatoes

8 cups low-sodium chicken broth (or homemade vegetable stock or water)

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Fresh parsley, chopped, for garnish

Sour cream, for serving (optional)


Instructions:

  1. Slice leeks in half lengthwise and wash thoroughly. Cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick half-moons. Heat olive oil and butter over medium heat in Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot. Add leeks and garlic and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until leeks are softened but not browned, about 10-12 minutes.
  2. While leeks are cooking, fill large bowl halfway with cold water. Peel potatoes, placing each in bowl of water immediately after peeling to prevent browning. Cut each potato in half lengthwise and slice into 1/2-inch-thick half-moons. Drain potato slices and add to pot along with stock and a few generous grinds of pepper. Raise heat to high and bring soup to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook until potatoes are very soft, about 20 minutes.
  3. Puree soup with an immersion blender or in batches in standing blender. If you like your soups on the hearty side, you can skip this step, or lightly puree (some pureeing makes for that lovely creamy texture, so don’t skip it completely). Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve with parsley and sour cream if desired. Soup reheats well and will keep in refrigerator for up to one week.
Recipe adapted from seriouseats.com