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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/12/18)

Bartlett Pears

These are easy to tell when ripe because they brighten in color (turn from green to yellow in tone) and have a wonderful fragrance. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Beets

If you don’t have time to roast or boil beets you can shorten the cook time dramatically by slicing off thin rounds and either sautéing, steaming, or boiling them, just peel them first with a vegetable peeler.

In the cooking world, beets are often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin” for their incredible range of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Although beets can be cooked in a variety of ways (including as a secret ingredient for deep dark chocolate cake-Google it!), roasting beets is one of the easiest and most delicious. Roasting beets intensifies their flavor, brings out their earthy sweetness, and makes their skin tender and easy to peel off. Roasted beets are particularly delicious in beet salads or just as a complementing side dish.

Kale

We love Apple Kale Salad: (Kale, Apple, Pear, Red Bell Pepper, Green onion, Carrot….)

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. Here are a few tips that have helped me. First make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered.

For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

Broccoli:

Pass the broccoli! Broccoli contains plant compounds which protect against cancer. Broccoli is great in salad, stir-fry, soup, roasted, steamed, or raw with your favorite veggie dip. Add Broccoli to your next box of good food delivery here.

Featured Recipe: Roasted Broccoli

The high heat with this method causes the broccoli to caramelize making this one of the tastiest ways to prepare and eat broccoli. Leave off the pecorino for a vegan option (try topping with a drizzle of tahini instead). Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

1 and ½ pounds broccoli crowns (roughly 2 heads)

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

4 garlic cloves, pressed

large pinch of dried red pepper flakes

½ teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons raw, sliced almonds (with or without skin)

2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 – 3 tablespoons freshly grated aged pecorino cheese (leave out for vegan option)

zest of half a lemon

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees Fahrenheit. If you prefer less crispy florets (or if your oven runs hot), you can reduce the oven temperature by 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit and adjust cooking time as necessary.

Line a sheet pan with parchment. Trim any dry, tough ends of the broccoli crowns, leaving roughly 2-inches of stalk attached. Slice the broccoli into ½-inch-thick steaks, starting in the center of each broccoli crown and working out to the edges, reserving any small or medium florets that fall off for roasting. Slice any large remaining florets in half lengthwise.

In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, pressed garlic, and red pepper flakes. Add the broccoli steaks and toss gently until evenly coated. Arrange the broccoli, cut-side down, on the lined sheet pan, setting them apart slightly. Sprinkle with salt.

Roast the broccoli for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, flip the broccoli, and sprinkle the almond slices evenly across the sheet pan. Roast for an additional 8 to 10 minutes, or until the broccoli is evenly caramelized and fork tender, and the almond slices are toasted and golden.

Transfer the broccoli to a platter, toss gently with the lemon juice and top with the grated pecorino cheese. Garnish with fresh lemon zest. Serve hot or at room temperature (it also tastes great cold). Leftover broccoli can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 days.

 

Recipe adapted from abeautifulplate.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/8/18)

plums

Plums

Great in fruit salads, atop green salads (think Balsamic vinegar, goat cheese, walnuts, red onions) because they’re firm enough to hold up with a little tossing. Try them atop plain Greek or coconut yogurt with a drizzle of honey for breakfast. Plums are particularly delicious in fruit galettes as baking them brings out their sweet-tart flavor. If too firm to use, place in a closed paper bag at room temperature for one to two days. Once ripe, plums can be kept in a plastic bag in the refrigerator up to three days.

Sugar Snap Peas

The sweetness of these crunchy veggie lies in their shell. Unlike shelling peas, sugar snap peas are best enjoyed fresh, shell and all. Simply “snap” off the stem bit, and you’re good to go. Great just on their own, they also go well on top of salad, in with pasta, sautéed (lightly) with any Asian-inspired dish or casseroles. Use within 5 days for best flavor and freshness.

 

Featured Recipe: Summer Veggie Quinoa Bowls

This Healthy Veggie Quinoa Bowl has freshly-sautéed corn, peas and broccoli mixed with cooked quinoa over a bed of lettuce and a side of avocado! It is vegan and gluten free and perfect for a light healthy lunch. Two choices of dressings. Can be made ahead and eaten cold.

Ingredients:

2 cups uncooked quinoa

2 ears fresh sweet corn (kernels removed—stand cleaned ears on end on a cutting board and slice from the top down, beginning at the base of the ears towards cutting board with paring knife. Continue to cut off the all corn kernels)

0.5 lb. fresh sugar snap peas (rinsed)

2 cups of broccoli (rinsed, roughly chopped)

1-2 green onions, entire part, diced

DRESSING(s):

Version one:

3 tbsp olive oil

½ a squeezed lemon

½ a squeezed lime

1 tsp sea salt

1 tsp pepper

2 tsp onion powder

Version Two, Asian-inspired:

2 tsp olive oil

Low sodium tamari sauce to taste (or soy sauce)

½ a squeezed lemon over the top

Instructions:

Cook quinoa according to directions on your package. Once done cooking, use a strainer and rinse the rice.

Chop your broccoli, remove corn kernels from cob (or use frozen), halve peas, and dice onion then place in a sauté pan on medium heat (wait until the quinoa only has 15 minutes left before starting this step as you don’t want to overcook your veggies).

Once quinoa is done add it to the sauté pan with the veggies, stir together and add your sauce/seasoning of choice. Remove from heat.

Serve with a side of lettuce and avocado or radish slices for extra fiber and to make your meal more filling, healthfully. Serves 4-6 depending on if you serve as a side or main meal.

Recipe adapted from tworaspberries.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 3/18/18)

Blood Oranges:

With ruby-red to maroon-colored flesh, blood oranges are a surprise when you cut them open; taste-wise, they’re tart-sweet and slightly berry-like.

Storage tips: To keep these ruby gems fresh longer, choose refrigeration over the fruit bowl―they’ll only last only a couple of days at room temperature, but up to two weeks in the fridge.

How to eat them: Blood oranges are best eaten fresh―out of hand, or in salads, salsas, or marmalades. If you’re following a recipe you may be asked to section the fruit. To do so, peel the orange, cut between the white membranes to expose the flesh, and remove the sections (for more juice, squeeze the leftover membranes).

Health benefits: Oranges are rich in antioxidants―vital for healthy cells―including vitamin C, which aids in healing, boosts your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and even helps reduce the risk of cancer. This citrus fruit is also a good source of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and, like vitamin C, reduce your cancer risk. (To maximize your fiber intake, be sure to eat some of the spongy white pith right under the skin.)

 

 

Mangos:

To peel a mango: using the tip of the mango as a guide, slice the two cheeks of the mango off, cutting around the stone in the center. Then place the edge of the mango against the lip of a glass and slide it down one of the halves, so that you’re using the glass like a giant spoon to scrape the mango from its skin. If your mango is ripe (yields to soft pressure, fragrant), you can get the glass to slide through it and separate the skin with ease. If you want to get the part around the pit, we advise going at it with a paring knife, or if you have a toddler, this will keep them busy for a while. Then, you can eat the half of mango, or, if you’re sharing, slice it up, cut it into cubes, and dump into a bowl, ready to serve!

 

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese.

Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

 

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or salad, but can also be used to liven up your Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. You can even grill them whole like spring onions and serve as a side dish with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Yams

Serves 4

Ingredients:

 

2 large yams

1 tablespoon honey

1-2 teaspoons crushed red-pepper flakes (or to taste)

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup plain Greek-style yogurt

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice, approximately 2 limes

2 green onions, both green and white parts, trimmed and thinly sliced, for garnish

Instructions:

Heat oven to 425. Cut the yams lengthwise into 4 wedges per yam. Put them in a large bowl, and toss them with the honey, ½ tablespoon of the crushed red-pepper flakes, the smoked paprika and 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Let it sit for 10 minutes or so, tossing once or twice to coat, as the oven heats.

Transfer the yams to a foil-lined, rimmed baking sheet, season with salt and pepper and then bake until they are deeply caramelized around the edges and soft when pierced with a fork at their thickest part, approximately 30 to 35 minutes.

As the yams roast, combine the yogurt, lime juice and remaining tablespoon of olive oil in a small bowl, and whisk to combine, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

When the yams are done, transfer them to a serving platter, drizzle the yogurt over them and garnish with the remaining pepper flakes, the green onions and some flaky sea salt.

 

Adapted from recipe by cooking.nytimes.com

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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 2/18/18)

Italian (Lacinato) Kale:

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you!

Try it: in the Tuscan soup (recipe below), or, in a salad. One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. To prevent kale from becoming bitter, make sure to make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!). Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and keeps it evenly covered. Use an olive oil & vinegar combination for the dressing.

Toppings: try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese.

Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

Bosc Pears:

Bosc pears are firm when ripe but you can tell when they are ready to eat when the area around the stem yields to light pressure and are lightly fragrant—usually after 2-3 days on the counter top. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

 

Featured Recipe: Zuppa Toscana

Serves 6

Ingredients:

 

1 tablespoon Olive Oil

1 lb. Italian Sausage (or sub 15 oz. Cannelloni Beans for vegan option)

¼ teaspoon Red Pepper flakes (or to taste—we advise don’t skip these!)

3 cloves Garlic, minced

1 Onion, diced

4 cups Chicken Broth (or, sub Vegetable Broth for vegan version)

3 Russet Potatoes, thinly sliced

2 cups Italian Kale, finely chopped

1 cup Heavy Cream (feel free to sub Half and Half or Whole Milk OR sub Coconut Milk OR Coconut Cream for vegan version)

salt and pepper to taste (note, because potatoes are salt-stealers, you’ll need more than you think you will)

Instructions:

Place a large pot over medium heat. Add the olive oil. Brown the sausage until no longer pink (if using cannelloni beans, skip this step and add in along with the potatoes). Add the red pepper flakes and onion and cook, stirring often for about 3 minutes, then add the garlic and cook, stirring often until the onions a translucent and the garlic is fragrant, about 2 more minutes. Be careful not to let the garlic burn or it will add that flavor your soup.

Add in the chicken or vegetable broth and potatoes. Bring the broth to a simmer, reduce the heat to medium-low, and cook until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.

At the end of cooking, add in the kale so that it just wilts and turns bright green—no need to overcook it.

Remove the soup from the heat, stir in the cream or cream substitute of your choice (whole milk, half and half, coconut milk or coconut cream), and season with salt and pepper to taste. Ladle into soup bowls and serve.

 

Adapted from recipe by alaskafromscratch.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 10/15/17)

Asian Pears:

Crunchy, juicy, and sweet. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable.

Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne (or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips, and Broccoli

Prep time: 20, Cook time: 40, Ready in 60 minutes. Serves 6.

Ingredients:

 

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 medium carrots (about 3/4 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick circles

1 1/2 cups Broccoli cut into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces

4 cups potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

3 medium parsnips (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 cup sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon dried rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

  1. Grease an 11 by 17-inch baking sheet pan with extra-virgin olive oil. Place vegetables in baking sheet and add the dried herbs, salt and pepper. Toss well, evenly coating all the vegetables with the seasonings and oil. Add more oil if the vegetables seem dry.

 

  1. Spread the vegetables evenly on a large baking sheet. Place on middle rack in oven and bake for 35 to 40 minutes.

 

Recipe adapted from: giadzy.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 10/1/2017)

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450 °F for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese. Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

 

Celery:

Because of its boat-like shape, celery works great with a filling as a fun and healthy snack. You can get creative when it comes to what you to pair it with. Peanut butter is a common ingredient, but you can stuff your celery with things like cream cheese with chopped nuts and raisins, garlicky chicken spread, or a nut butter with seeds and honey. When making a celery themed salad, you can either go sweet (with thinly sliced apples, pecans, raisins, yogurt or sour cream, honey and a pinch of cinnamon) or savory (adding it to your everyday green salad or making a chicken salad with it).

 

Delicata Squash:

There are many ways to cook and use this squash: they make a great side to almost any dish or can be added to pasta, soups, salad, sautéed, or stuffed. To bake, cut in half lengthwise, remove seed and cut halves crosswise into ½ inch wedges (or skip this step and leave in halves). Toss/slather in melted butter or coconut oil and about ½ tsp of salt. Spread out on a cookie sheet and roast in the oven at 425 °F for about 25-30 minutes, tossing once or twice, until browned.

 

 

Savory Quinoa Stuffed Delicata Squash

Easy to make and deliciously sweet and savory! Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

2 Delicata squash

1/2 C uncooked quinoa

1 C vegetable broth

1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp olive oil

6 oz. sliced button mushrooms (OR use broccoli florets or even chopped celery if your box doesn’t contain mushrooms)

1/2 C chopped onion

1 clove minced garlic

1/8 tsp rosemary

1/4 tsp thyme

Pinch salt

Pinch black pepper

Instructions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400 ºF. Meanwhile, cut the Delicata in half and remove the seeds. The seeds can be discarded, but they can also be reserved for roasting, much like pumpkin seeds. Lightly brush olive oil over the insides and outsides of the squash bottoms and tops and season with salt and pepper to taste. Bake for 25-30 minutes. The squash are done when the inner flesh is tender.

2. Once squash are in the oven, make the quinoa. First rinse the quinoa well and then combine in a sauce pan with vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook covered until all of the liquid is absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, sauté the mushrooms (or broccoli florets) and onion in 1 teaspoon of olive oil for about 5 minutes, or until tender. Add the garlic, rosemary, and thyme to the pan and cook 1 more minute. Season with the salt and pepper. By now the quinoa should be done cooking. Measure 1 cup of cooked quinoa into the skillet with the mushrooms and onion. Stir to evenly combine.

4. Remove the cooked squash from the oven and spoon the quinoa pilaf evenly into each half. Consider garnishing with a little parsley for added color. Serve immediately.

Recipe adapted from: simpleseasonal.com

 

 

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/30/17)

Green Beans:

Green beans are a workhorse vegetable: nothing flashy, rarely the star, but always dependable in a supporting role. They’re versatile, too – they’ll work well with just about any cuisine.

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, you can steam them just until bright green and tender, then toss with a little butter, or, sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425°F for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

 

Inchelium Red Garlic:

One of the most productive of all the heirloom garlics, this soft neck variety is also an artichoke type. This means that its bulbs cluster in layers like artichoke petals. This makes these garlic bulbs particularly perfect for roasting. Roasted garlic cloves are a softer, milder version of their spicy raw selves. Spread them over crackers or bread for a delicious appetizer or mix into spreads, dressings or dips for delicious flavor. Unlike raw garlic, roasted garlic won’t hurt your stomach so eat as much as your heart desires! While foil-wrapped garlic is a popular way to roast it, it is possible to avoid foil-wrapping your food and still get good roasted garlic.

To Roast Garlic: Remove the outside layers. Cut the tops of each garlic bulb, so can see the exposed the garlic within. Then, lay the bulbs cut side down, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Cook in a 350 °F oven for 35-40 minutes or until done. Let cool and peel the clove from the outside in. Keep roasted garlic in a canning jar (pint size should be sufficient) with lid, in the fridge for no more than 1 week (7 days).

3-Ingredient Garlic Broccoli Stir Fry

“Compared to your usual oven roasting method or blanching, this recipe does not require you to heat up the oven, or boil a pot of water. So, you save extra 15 minutes, plus you can finish up cooking in one pan! The hot pan will steam the broccoli in a minute, and lightly crisp up the garlic at the same time. For a light dinner, simply throw some leftover chicken into the pan and let it heat up with the veggies – dinner in 5 minutes!” – omnivore’s cookbook

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic

1 big head broccoli, separated into florets

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup chicken stock

  1. Heat a large heavy-duty skillet until hot. Add oil. Swirl to coat the bottom. Add garlic and broccoli, and sprinkle with salt. Cook and stir to coat broccoli with oil.

2. Add chicken stock. Cover and cook for 1 minute, or until the broccoli reaches your desired doneness. Turn to low heat and carefully taste the broccoli. Adjust seasoning by adding more salt, or cover to cook a bit longer if necessary.

3. Serve warm.

From omnivorescookbook.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/4/17)

Cabbage:

Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my “just about anything”. I like to make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese. Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

Leeks:

Leeks are cousins to the old, familiar onion, but have a sweeter, more delicate flavor reminiscent of garlic or chives and are delicious no matter how they’re cooked. Additionally, leeks contain generous amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making the vegetable a wise addition to a healthy diet. You can cook leeks by poaching them in chicken broth, pan-frying them in a little oil, or boiling them until tender, or you can include the leeks in a variety of other recipes (such as the one below).

 

Featured Recipe: Classic Potato Salad

Ingredients:

3 medium potatoes (1 to 1 ½ pounds), quartered

1 ½ tablespoons white vinegar

1 large celery stalks, diced

1 Leek, diced

3 hard boiled eggs, peeled

¾ cups mayonnaise

½ tablespoon yellow mustard

¾ teaspoons celery seed kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper paprika for garnish

Directions:

  1. Bring potatoes to a boil in large pot of cold water that’s been liberally salted. Reduce the heat to medium high or a lightly rolling boil and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the potatoes are easily pierced with a paring knife. Drain and let cool until just able to handle.
  2. Peel the skins from the potatoes and cut into large diced pieces. Transfer the warm potatoes to a large mixing bowl and sprinkle with the white vinegar and stir. Allow the potatoes to cool, about 15 minutes. Add the celery and leeks Chop 2 of the hard-boiled eggs and add to the potato mixture.
  3. In a medium bowl, mix the mayonnaise, yellow mustard, celery seed and salt and pepper. Mix well into the potato mixture and season with more salt and pepper if needed. Slice the last egg into thin slices and place the slices on top of the salad. Sprinkle with paprika if desired. Chill for at least 1 hour Recipe adapted from “foodiecrush.com”
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Know Your Produce – Kohlrabi

Have you ever eaten a kohlrabi? These little sputnik-shaped vegetables come in green or purple, can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. The word kohlrabi is German for cabbage turnip (kohl as in cole-slaw, and rübe for turnip), though kohlrabi is more related to cabbage and cauliflower than to root vegetables. We usually eat them raw, just peeled, sliced and added to a salad, but they are also delicious cooked and are often used in Indian cuisine.

If the kohlrabi leaves are still attached to the bulb, trim the  m and store separately. If the leaves are in good shape—firm and green—they can be cooked but will need to be used within a couple of days. The bulbs should be stored, unwashed, in a plastic bag. They will hold for about a week in the refrigerator.

Simple preparation: Tender, young kohlrabi is delicious eaten raw. Peel the outer skin with a paring knife. Slice, dice, or grate, and add to salads. Use on raw vegetable platters or serve with a creamy dip. Substitute in recipes calling for radishes. Grated kohlrabi can be added to slaw, but lightly salt it first and let stand for several minutes. Squeeze to remove any excess water before adding dressi  ng. Kohlrabi can also be steamed or boiled. For this preparation don’t peel until after they are cooked. Steam or boil until bulbs are tender, peel skin, and season with butter, salt, and pepper, a cheese sauce, or just enjoy plain.

If the leaves attached to the kohlrabi bulb are fresh and green, they can be enjoyed as a cooked green. Wash the leaves and remove the ribs. Blanch in boiling water until just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain and squeeze excess water from leaves. Chop leaves, then sauté in a little olive oil or butter. Season with salt and pepper. Add a splash of vinegar or squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

From www.care2.com/greenliving/how-to-use-kohlrabi