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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/24/18)

Garlic Scapes

You can use scapes just like you would garlic; their flavor is milder, so you get the nice garlic taste without some of the bite. Use on top of pizza, in pasta, in salsas, and as a replacement for garlic in most other recipes. There are many things you can do with scapes, but my personal preference is to turn them into garlic scape pesto. It’s a sharper, greener take on traditional basil pesto that can be used to add a fresh garlicky zing to just about anything – Spoon it into soups, spread it on sandwiches, toss with cooked pasta, beat it into scrambled eggs, and (best of all) slather it onto pizza dough before adding on the toppings. It freezes beautifully, too, so it’s easy to make an extra-large batch to tide you over until next spring.

Cherries

Although you’ll quite likely find yourself eating them straight from the bag that they traveled to your home from, you should also try serving cherries with dinner over ice. The ice slowly melt into the bottom of the bowl, dragging some of the buoyed little fruits with them. Those ones are the best – completely cold and crisp throughout, melting away the summer heat from the inside.

NUTRITION: Cherries

Cherries are a sweet summertime treat, but also a great fruit to enjoy for health and nutrition. Cherries are one of the top antioxidant-rich foods, contain melatonin for a good night’s sleep, and fight inflammation and pain linked to arthritis. A cup of cherries has 3 grams of fiber, which aids in digestion, lowers cholesterol, controls blood sugar and can help with weight loss. —Stemilt.com

Amounts per 1 cup, with pits (138g): Cherries are fat-, cholesterol- and sodium-free. A good source of Dietary Fiber (2.9 g / 12% DV) and Vitamin C (9.7 mg. / 16% DV). Also a source of Potassium (306 mg / 9%), Omega 3 amino acids (35.9 mg) Omega 6 amino acids (37.3 mg).

—Source: nutritiondata.self.com.

 

Featured Recipe: Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip

Wondering what to do with garlic scapes? Puree them into a quick and creamy, garlicky bean and garlic scape dip! Great as a healthy snack or for a party!

Ingredients:

1 cup garlic scapes

2 15-oz cans white cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup water

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

kosher salt and pepper, to taste

 

Instructions:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and set out a bowl of ice water. Add the garlic scapes to the pot and boil for 30 seconds. Drain and plunge the scapes into the ice water. This makes the scapes tender without overcooking them, bringing out their tender flavor. Roughly chop most of the scapes and finely chop a few for topping the dip (set aside for topping along with a sprig or two of parsley).

Add the roughly chopped garlic scapes, white beans, olive oil, water, and parsley to a food processor (or blender) and process until smooth. Add more water if it’s too thick. Taste the dip and add salt and pepper to taste.

Serve topped with a few finely chopped garlic scapes, chopped parsley, and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Recipe adapted from justalittlebitofbacon.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of July 9, 2017)

Garlic Scapes:

You can use Scapes just like you would garlic; their flavor is milder, so you get the nice garlic taste without some of the bite. Use them on top of pizza, in pasta, in salsas, and as a replacement for garlic in most other recipes. There are many things you can do with scapes, but my personal preference is to turn them into garlic scape pesto. It’s a sharper, greener take on traditional basil pesto that can be used to add a fresh garlicky zing to just about anything – Spoon it into soups, spread it on sandwiches, toss with cooked pasta, beat it into scrambled eggs, and (best of all) slather it onto pizza dough before adding on the toppings. It freezes beautifully, too, so it’s easy to make an extra-large batch to tide you over until next spring.

Kale:

Apple Kale Salad: (Kale, Apple, Pear, Red Bell Pepper, Green onion, Carrot….) Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. Here are a few tips that have helped me. First make sure to make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered. For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/17/17)

Plums: From sweet to tart, plums are big part of summer fruit in the Pacific Northwest. While great fresh as it or atop yogurt, fruit salads and even green salads (think walnuts, soft goat cheese and arugula), plums also shine when cooked as a sauce along with chicken, pork or duck. Care: Eat ripe plums immediately or put them in the refrigerator (unwashed, not in a sealed bag) for use within five days. When ready to eat, wash and enjoy! To hasten the ripening, leave plums on the counter, out of the sun, in a paper bag with an already-ripe apple or banana. Check daily. Plums are ripe when stem area yields to gentle pressure or is slightly fragrant.

 

Garlic Scapes: Garlic scapes are the beginning of what would be the garlic plant’s flower; if they’re left on the garlic plant, less energy goes towards developing the head of garlic underground. So, by harvesting these scapes, we get an early taste of the garlic to come down the road, and the bulbs can keep developing for a later harvest.

 

You can use scapes just like you would garlic; their flavor is milder, so you get the nice garlic taste without some of the bite. Use them on top of pizza, in pasta, in salsas, and as a replacement for garlic in most other recipes.

 

Featured Recipe: Plum-Chipotle Barbecue Sauce

Plums boost the tangy-sweet flavor of this quick homemade barbecue sauce, which is finger-lickin’ good on grilled chicken, pork (ribs, especially), and duck. Wait until the meat is almost cooked before brushing on the sauce, so it doesn’t burn. Plus, you get the added benefit of knowing exactly what’s inside your barbeque sauce. It’s a win-win. Makes 1 cup.

 

Ingredients:

 

1 lb. firm-ripe plums (about 4 medium), pitted and quartered

1/2 cup chopped yellow onion

2 Tbs. balsamic vinegar

2 Tbs. cider vinegar

1/4 cup honey or brown sugar

1 Tbs. minced garlic

1 tsp. minced seeded canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce

1 tsp. kosher salt

1/8 tsp. ground cloves

 

 

Directions:

 

  1. Put all of the ingredients in a heavy-duty 3-quart saucepan and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to medium, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the plums break down, about 10 minutes. Uncover and simmer until thick, 5 to 7 minutes.
  2. Purée the sauce in a blender until smooth. Use or cool to room temperature and refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

 

Recipe adapted from finecoooking.com

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Garlic Scapes!

Know Your Produce: Garlic scapes

Garlic scapes are the beginning of what would be the garlic plant’s flower; if they’re left on the garlic plant, less energy goes towards developing the head of garlic underground. So, by harvesting these scapes, you cooks get an early taste of the garlic to come down the road, and the bulbs can keep developing.

You can use scapes just like you would garlic; their flavor is milder, so you get the nice garlic taste without some of the bite. Use them on top of pizza, in pasta, and as a replacement for garlic in most other recipes.

Store: Store garlic scapes in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator. Store away from your fruit, because garlic is generous with its fragrance, and you may not appreciate biting into a peach and tasting…garlic. Garlic scapes will keep up to two weeks if kept in an airtight container. They freeze well, too–blanched or not–but they tend to lose some of the garlicky heat during storage. You can remove the stalk tip above the pod before using; some people use the whole scape, but the pod and tip are more fibrous than the tender stalk.

Prep: Wash under cool water when ready to use. Whether you’re sautéing, pureeing, or dicing them, garlic scapes are a great addition to many different meals. Great in multiple forms, this ingredient gives many recipes an extra dash of flavor that will compliment a variety of summer dishes like mashed potatoes, stir fry, omelets, pesto, or pasta.

Use: Garlic scapes can be used almost anywhere garlic is; however, keep in mind it is milder in flavor, so you can use more of it per recipe. Scapes tend to get tough and/or lose flavor if overcooked, so start simple. To learn how much cooking is enough and how much is too much, cut scapes to desired lengths and sauté in a little olive oil over medium heat, adding salt and pepper to taste. The end result should be a side dish that is elegant and tasty.

Here’s a recipe for garlic scapes in vegetable stir-fry. Here’s a recipe for oven-roasted corn on the cob with garlic scape butter. 

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Vegetable Stir Fry

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic scapes, chopped
2 tablespoons peanut sauce
1 cup chopped broccoli
1 cup sliced carrots
1 cup sliced green cabbage
1 cup sliced celery
1 cup fresh snap peas
1 cup sliced zucchini
1 cup sliced tomato
1 cup chopped green onions
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon cornstarch

Directions:

  1. Heat oil in a wok or large heavy skillet. Add garlic and peanut sauce, and stir-fry for 4 minutes.
  2. Stir in broccoli, carrots, cabbage, celery, snap peas, zucchini, tomato, and green onions. Season with salt, and stir-fry for 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. In a small bowl, mix together water, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Stir into vegetables, and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, or until sauce is thickened.
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Oven Roasted Corn on the Cob with Garlic Scape Butter

Recipe adapted from  www.foodnetwork.com

Cook Time: 30 min
Level: Easy
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
4 ears fresh corn
Garlic Scape Butter (optional)

Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place corn in husks directly on the oven rack (or on a sheet of foil if you’re concerned about a piece falling off and starting a fire) and roast for 30 minutes or until corn is soft. Peel down the husks and use as a handle when eating. Be sure to have something sturdy, to not only hold onto the corn as it comes out of the oven (it’s HOT), but also if you plan on husking it before you bring them to the table.

Garlic Scape Butter
Garlic scape butter makes a delicious topping to fresh steamed vegetables such as peas or green beans, or use it to sauté vegetables such as zucchini or baby potatoes (parboil them first), or top poached chicken or fish with a little slice as a sauce. Pasta? Rice? Garlic bread? Yes, yes, yes. Great stuff.
1 cup
1 hour – 20 minutes prep time.

6 garlic scapes
1/3 cup parsley sprigs
2/3 cup unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
pepper to taste
1 teaspoon rubbed basil (optional)

Rinse the garlic scapes. Wash and drain the parsley well. Put them in a food processor and process until finely chopped. Add about two tablespoons of the butter, the salt and pepper (basil if wanted), and blend in well.

Put this mixture in a small skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the garlic scapes are softened and fragrant; about 5 minutes. Remove to a small bowl and let cool completely. In the fridge is fine.

When the mixture is cool, mix in the remaining butter. Keep it chilled. It can be rolled in parchment paper then placed in a zippered freezer bag, and kept frozen if desired.
From: http://seasonalontariofood.blogspot.com/2009/06/garic-scape-butter.html