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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 8/19/18)

Apples:
Apples are one of those quintessential healthy eating choices! You can dice them up and throw them into your hot cereal with some cinnamon for a fresh take on breakfast, toss them in smoothies, slice them atop green salads to sweeten them up and add texture, dip them in nut butter or yogurt for a snack, roast with savory fall veggies, bake with a topping of your favorite granola…so many ways to enjoy them! And perhaps the best part? Antioxidants and phytochemicals in apples have been linked to help prevent a number of chronic diseases, including: Alzheimer’s, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes and more. Store unwashed apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Be sure to store separately. See healthline.com for more nutrition information on Apples!

Green Beans:
Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Frisée

You’ve no doubt seen frisée before, perhaps without realizing it, tucked away inside a mesclun baby greens mix. Also called curly endive, the curly, pale green leaves are frizzy in appearance. Frisée is a variety of chicory, as you’ll be clued in to with the first solo bite: it’s one of those bitters we were talking about in last week’s newsletter. Store: in the fridge for up to five days (rinse first), in plastic or other non-breathable material, so it doesn’t wilt. Use: most often served fresh in salads, try it wilted or sautéed to mellow its bitterness. Frisée pairs well with flavor-packed ingredients and fats: Dress leaves with a warm vinaigrette of roast-chicken pan drippings and sherry or red wine vinegar, toss in browned bits of thick-cut pancetta, ham, or steak bits, or top with a poached or fried egg.

 

Featured Recipe: Farmer’s Market Salad

This dish combines all of those wonderful summer veggies with a creamy, yet light, dressing that is full of flavor. This version has cooked chicken, but this salad can certainly be served on its own. Likewise, feel free to swap in your favorite vegan dressing if dairy isn’t in your diet. Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

2 medium (about 1 lb.) summer squashes (zucchini, yellow crookneck), sliced thin

1 bell pepper, sliced

2 cups tomatoes cut into 1-inch pieces

2 cups frisée, chopped

½ cup green onions, sliced

1 ear fresh corn, off the cob or 1 cup

6” length of cucumber, sliced

2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded or sliced, this would be 3/4 uncooked boneless chicken breast

DRESSING:

1/3 cup buttermilk

1/3 cup soy-free mayonnaise

1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon lime juice

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

If you are starting with uncooked boneless chicken breast, preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Brush the chicken with olive oil on both sides and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish and roast for 15-20 minutes until cooked though. The internal temperature should be 165 degrees.

Let cool and either slice into thin strips or shred with a fork.

In a large bowl combine the summer squash, bell pepper, tomatoes, frisée, green onions, corn, cucumber, and shredded chicken.

In a small bowl combine the buttermilk, mayonnaise, Greek yogurt, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the salad. Combine well. Serve at once.

 

Recipe adapted from anothertablespoon.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 5/27/18)

Cilantro:

Store cilantro so that they have some breathing room (otherwise they will melt down on you—too much moisture speeds decay). Try removing the band so that they are spread out, wrapping them in a paper towel or cotton cloth, then placing in plastic/airtight—that’s how I’ve had the best luck keeping them fresh. You might also try storing in a jar (used like a vase), but with a bag draped over the leaves, so that the tender leaves don’t dehydrate on you. Most of the flavor in cilantro is in their stalks, so be sure to include that when you dice it up for recipes. Cilantro is a great item to have on hand, it can go with any Mexican-inspired dish as well as your Thai dishes (think lime, curry, coconut, shrimp). Of course, it is great dumped on top of tacos, and can also be mixed in with butter to eat with sweet corn.

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner—try sautéing them in little olive oil and garlic. They are also just as good lightly steamed and topped with ghee or coconut butter. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Turnips:

Turnips can be sliced up and eaten raw with a little salt and lemon juice atop a salad. They can also be cooked much the same way as a potato, you can even boil them until tender and make mashed turnips. You can also roast, sauté, or add to soup. To season try a combo of salt, pepper, and lemon or when baking, toss in coconut oil, salt, pepper, ginger and drizzled in honey (roast at 400° until tender). Toppings: butter, salt, pepper, chives and parmesan.

Featured Recipe: Homemade Pico de Gallo

How to make pico de gallo — a fresh tomato salsa — with tomatoes, onion and cilantro. Makes 8 servings or about 3 cups.

Ingredients:

1 1/2 pounds tomatoes, chopped

1 medium onion, chopped (about 2/3 cup)

1-2 jalapeño or serrano peppers, finely diced (seeds and membranes removed for a milder salsa)

1/2 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Juice of 1 lime

Salt to taste

Instructions:

Add the tomatoes, onion, cilantro, diced peppers and lime juice to a bowl. Generously season with salt — start with 1/2 teaspoon and go from there. Set the salsa aside for 30 minutes to let the flavors meld.

After 30 minutes, stir the salsa — making sure to distribute the juices left at the bottom of the bowl. Taste and adjust with more salt (hint: you’ll probably need more than you think, so, taste, salt, taste, salt). Store for up to 3 days in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Recipe adapted from www.inspiredtaste.net

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/31/17)

Kiwi:

Kiwi is most commonly eaten as is by cutting in half and spooning out the inside, but it can also make a great addition to breakfast food, salad or dessert. It can be used in smoothies (try with bananas and avocado), as a topping for granola and yogurt or cereal, or as a decorative and delicious addition to pie or meringue. It makes a great addition to fruit salad or even a green salad if you’re feeling adventurous. And, kiwi makes for a refreshing drink when added to ice water with mint and/or a squeeze of lemon.

 

Radicchio, Treviso:

A favorite of Italians, whom it is believed their cultivation originated with, Treviso radicchio look a bit like purple romaine hearts. Italians almost never use radicchios in a mixed salad, but savor them alone with the simplest of olive-oil dressings. Often, they cook radicchio, turning to varieties like Treviso, that are milder in flavor, since the bitterness of radicchio intensifies with cooking. The tonic bitterness, however, is a good contrast to rich or fatty flavors. Radicchio is good braised, grilled, or in a soup. Store: keep radicchio in a tightly sealed bag in the refrigerator for up to one week.

 

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Treviso

Cook time: 20 minutes. Serves 2-4.

Ingredients:

 

1 head Treviso

1 to 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil or other cooking oil

Sea salt

1 to 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. While the oven heats, trim the treviso: cut in half lengthwise. Rub or brush the entire treviso halves with oil. Spread across baking sheet, cut side up.
  3. Cook until the edges are wilted, about 12 minutes. Turn over, and roast until tender, another 8 minutes or so.
  4. Remove from oven, sprinkle the cooked cut-side with salt.
  5. Transfer to a serving platter and drizzle with balsamic vinegar. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature.

Alternate toppings: parmesan cheese or crumbled blue cheese with or without the balsamic, or, drizzle of rice wine vinegar & hot chile oil, sprinkle with red chile flakes instead of the balsamic.

 

adapted from recipe by thespruce.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 9/3/17)

StarKrimson Pears:

They are delicious just raw and out of the box, but if you are looking for something different, try sautéing them in butter with a drizzle of maple syrup or honey and serve them over almond butter toast. Or try adding them (thinly sliced) to a grilled cheese sandwich or your panini!

Patty Pan Squash:
Heat olive oil and butter in a skillet over medium-high heat until it foams up, usually 1 to 2 minutes. Sauté 1 small onion (diced) in the olive oil-butter until tender and translucent. Add sliced squash and garlic; season with lemon pepper. Sauté until squash is easily pierced with a fork, 5 to 6 minutes.

Green Beans:
You can enjoy raw or cooked, in salads, soups or by themselves. My go-to meals are anything stir-fry. They are quick to make, simple, and healthy. Green beans make a delicious stir-fry, check out the recipe, below!

Chicken – Green Bean Stir Fry – by Peruvian Chick

Ingredients:

1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced
1½ teaspoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons soy sauce, divided
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons sesame or vegetable oil, divided
6 scallions, ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces on the diagonal
1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled, thinly sliced crosswise
12 ounces green beans, trimmed, halved crosswise (about 4 cups) OR 1 lb. Patty Pan Squash, cut into 1-inch pieces
Steamed white rice and sesame seeds (for serving; optional)
Salt

Instructions:
1. Prep all of your ingredients and have them ready and handy to use. Toss chicken, cornstarch, a pinch of salt and 1 Tbsp. of soy sauce in a medium bowl.
2. Heat 1 Tbsp. of oil in a large nonstick pan over high heat. When oil is hot, add scallions and ginger and cook, tossing until scallions are browned and softened, usually about 2 minutes. Add green beans and a pinch of salt and cook, tossing often, until green beans are crisp, but still tender, usually about 4 minutes. Transfer green bean mixture to another bowl.
3. Heat the remaining 1 Tbsp. of oil in same pan over high. When oil is shimmering again, add chicken mixture and arrange slices in a single layer. Cook, until chicken is browned and caramelized on the first side. Toss and continue to cook until it is completely cooked through, usually about a minute or two longer. Pour in the soy-sauce & honey mixture along with the green bean mixture, and cook, tossing briskly until sauce is thickened and all ingredients are coated, usually about 30 seconds. Remove from heat and taste, rectify seasoning and serve with white rice. Enjoy!

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/6/17)

This week’s How to Eat Your BOX and recipe brought to you by Ashley Rodriguez.

 

Green Beans:

I’m not one to eat green beans raw like my children although thinly sliced and added to green salads is a fine vegetal bite but the truth is my favorite way to eat green beans is when they are deeply tender and sweet.

This year I’ve discovered grilled green beans and that is now my favorite way to enjoy them.

Roasting is also a good choice when you don’t want to turn on the grill. Roast until thoroughly crisp and they’ve nearly shriveled down to nearly nothing. Dress in a simple vinaigrette and serve alongside anything.

When blanching green beans be sure to make the water taste of the sea. This will not only provide an adequate seasoning for the beans but also help to preserve the texture.

Zucchini:

Raw, roasted, sautéed, grilled – I love it all.

Use a vegetable peeler to shave long thin strips of raw zucchini. Toss with basil, olive oil, lemon juice or red wine vinegar and a heap of halved cherry tomatoes. Finish with fresh feta or goat cheese if you’d like.

Grilled zucchini steaks make a lovely accompaniment to grilled chicken, steak, or fish. Top with a fine chop of fresh herbs (basil, mint and chives are nice options), lemon zest, and garlic. Thin with a bit of olive oil.

Whenever you grill zucchini brush with plenty of olive oil and be sure to use a good bit of salt.

Small tender zucchini is best for eating raw or for a quick sauté. Larger zucchini can tend to lose some of its sweetness but are perfect for baking.

 

Grilled Green Beans with Basil Gremolata and Parmesan Brittle

This recipe is from my next book – yet to be titled. It uses my current favorite cooking method for green beans; grilling. While warm and freshly charred the green beans are tossed in a fragrant basil gremolata (an herb sauce laced with lemon, garlic and sometimes anchovy). It’s then topped with crispy baked Parmesan that you will want to put on all the things.

Ingredients:

1 1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon sea salt

1 cup basil leaves, finely minced

Zest and juice from 1 lemon

1 garlic clove, finely minced

Flake salt

1 cup crumbled Parmesan Brittle (recipe below)

Bring a large stock pot of heavily salted water to a boil. Meanwhile fill a large bowl with ice and cold water. Blanch the beans just until their color shifts, about 2 minutes. Shock them to halt the cooking process by adding them to the ice water. I find a spider – the tool often used when frying – is the best for retrieving the beans from the boiling water. Or tongs.

Drain the cooled beans and toss with the olive oil and sea salt. Grill over high heat until the beans are tender and deeply charred in parts.

In a large bowl combine the basil, lemon zest and juice, and garlic clove. Toss the warm beans in the gremolata. Taste a bean and add flake salt or more sea salt if needed.

Turn out the beans onto a platter and finish with the Parmesan Brittle.

*To prevent the beans from falling into the cavernous grill set a wire cooling rack (not rubber coated) over the grill grates and place the beans on the wire rack.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/30/17)

Green Beans:

Green beans are a workhorse vegetable: nothing flashy, rarely the star, but always dependable in a supporting role. They’re versatile, too – they’ll work well with just about any cuisine.

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, you can steam them just until bright green and tender, then toss with a little butter, or, sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425°F for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

 

Inchelium Red Garlic:

One of the most productive of all the heirloom garlics, this soft neck variety is also an artichoke type. This means that its bulbs cluster in layers like artichoke petals. This makes these garlic bulbs particularly perfect for roasting. Roasted garlic cloves are a softer, milder version of their spicy raw selves. Spread them over crackers or bread for a delicious appetizer or mix into spreads, dressings or dips for delicious flavor. Unlike raw garlic, roasted garlic won’t hurt your stomach so eat as much as your heart desires! While foil-wrapped garlic is a popular way to roast it, it is possible to avoid foil-wrapping your food and still get good roasted garlic.

To Roast Garlic: Remove the outside layers. Cut the tops of each garlic bulb, so can see the exposed the garlic within. Then, lay the bulbs cut side down, on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Cook in a 350 °F oven for 35-40 minutes or until done. Let cool and peel the clove from the outside in. Keep roasted garlic in a canning jar (pint size should be sufficient) with lid, in the fridge for no more than 1 week (7 days).

3-Ingredient Garlic Broccoli Stir Fry

“Compared to your usual oven roasting method or blanching, this recipe does not require you to heat up the oven, or boil a pot of water. So, you save extra 15 minutes, plus you can finish up cooking in one pan! The hot pan will steam the broccoli in a minute, and lightly crisp up the garlic at the same time. For a light dinner, simply throw some leftover chicken into the pan and let it heat up with the veggies – dinner in 5 minutes!” – omnivore’s cookbook

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic

1 big head broccoli, separated into florets

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup chicken stock

  1. Heat a large heavy-duty skillet until hot. Add oil. Swirl to coat the bottom. Add garlic and broccoli, and sprinkle with salt. Cook and stir to coat broccoli with oil.

2. Add chicken stock. Cover and cook for 1 minute, or until the broccoli reaches your desired doneness. Turn to low heat and carefully taste the broccoli. Adjust seasoning by adding more salt, or cover to cook a bit longer if necessary.

3. Serve warm.

From omnivorescookbook.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (week of 1/8/2017)

Spinach:

Spinach is one of those handy vegetables that can be used raw or cooked. Used in salad, it’s a nice change from the norm. Try using thinly sliced green onions, cucumber, and apples from this week’s box in yours! For dressing, vinaigrettes go well with spinach. I like to mix balsamic vinegar with olive oil but just about any dressing will do. Spinach is used in cooking just as often as it is used fresh. It makes a great addition for scrambled eggs, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, pasta, or sauté. Some like to sauté it up in just a little olive oil and garlic and eat it like Popeye. I even enjoy adding a handful to my smoothies.

Celery:

Celery is a popular finger food as well as a flavorful addition to soups. Because of their shape, they are great for stuffing for a fun and flavorful snack. You can get pretty creative when it comes to what you put on them: Peanut butter is the first thing that comes to mind but you can stuff your celery with just about anything. Cream cheese makes a good filler, try it mixed with chopped nuts and raisins. Celery is also often used in salad. You can go sweet: using thinly sliced apples, pecans, raisins, yogurt or sour cream, honey and a pinch of cinnamon or make it savory with lettuce or spinach, finely chopped onion, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar, salt and pepper.

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or on salad. I like adding them to my soup. They add a freshness to Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle soup. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. Or, you can even grill them whole like spring onions and eat them all by themselves with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little

salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

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How To Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/27/16)

Sugar Pie Pumpkins:

The first time I roasted a pumpkin, I failed to realize that the stringy insides are actually not the part we want to eat. Lucky for me (and you) I’ve come a long way since that first roast.

Sugar Pie Pumpkins are ideal for…you guessed it: pie! They are sweet and have a soft silky texture when roasted.

To roast, preheat your oven to 350°F. Cover a large sheet pan with parchment paper.

Okay, so here’s where I admit that roasting pumpkins or squash often terrifies me. Really it’s just the part where you have to hack it in half. I always fear that I’ll walk away less a finger or two. That’s why I roast the pumpkin whole (or even microwave for a couple of minutes) for 10 minutes before cutting in half. The pumpkin starts to soften so the knife slides through the skin and flesh without much pressure. Let it cool slightly then cut in half and scoop out the stringy bits and seeds. Return the pumpkin to the oven, flesh down, and continue to roast until a fork easily slips through the skin and flesh.

Once cool, peel away the skin using a spoon to help scoop out the soft flesh. Pureé the pumpkin in a blender or food processor then use as you would canned pumpkin.

Breads, muffins, cakes and such are all lovely places for pumpkin pureé to live, but let’s not forget about milkshakes (a scoop of pureé along with organic vanilla ice cream and a bit of pumpkin pie spice) or smoothies (pumpkin pureé mixed with plain yogurt blended with honey or dates along with pumpkin pie spice and perhaps a banana if you’d like).

Or, take your pumpkin down the savory route by combining it with a flavorful stock and a bit of paprika. Warm it up, season and stir in a bit of sour cream or créme fraiche for a rich tang. I like to stir a bit of the pureé into my homemade macaroni and cheese, it adds a bit of rich flavor and nutrition that kids never complain about.

We’ve covered dessert, lunch and dinner, but let’s not forget about breakfast. Stir a bit of pureé into yogurt or oatmeal, sweeten with maple syrup and add a bit of cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/20/16)

Green Beans:

Who hasn’t eaten green bean casserole for Thanksgiving? My family serves this dish every year. It’s tradition. And, along with that tradition comes a long list of canned and processed ingredients, full of sodium and preservatives. Now, I don’t want to spoil your Thanksgiving, especially if you have that one Aunt who always brings this dish – and it will to start a family feud if you say anything – I would rather you enjoy your time with family and not worry about this one day out of the year. However, if you are the chef, I would highly recommend your opting for fresh, healthier ingredients. It will take (a little) more time to prepare, but honestly, your health is worth it. Besides, it tastes way better! Canned, processed foods just don’t taste good to me anymore. I can feel my body objecting when I eat that food because I am not desensitized to it anymore. Once you rid your body of chemicals your brain can function the way it should, and warn you when you’re eating something that is not compatible with your body. I’m not temped to buy junk anymore, because it just doesn’t look appealing to me. This Thanksgiving, why not change up the traditional dish and use those fresh green beans from your box. While you’re at it, opt for your own homemade sauce instead of that can of mushroom soup. You can even make your own version of the French onions that everyone loves. Try one the recipes I’ve linked here and here:

Broccolini:

I love this miniature broccoli/asparagus (though not actually related to asparagus-it just looks this way)! I tend to prefer it over broccoli because it is so easy to cook and requires little prep. Simply cut off the ends (I like to take a good inch or two because the ends can be chewy), toss in some olive oil or lemon juice and throw in the oven. It’s more delicate than its cousin and requires less cook time. I don’t want to tell you how many times I’ve burned this vegetable. :/ Try baking at 425°F for 10-15 minutes until tender. Or, you can add it to a boiling pot of water and let cook for 2-5 minutes, depending on how tender vs crunchy you want. Add to sautéed garlic or onions (and pine nuts if you have them). You can run your broccolini under cold water to stop the cooking process while sautéing, then heat them up again with the garlic.

Spinach Mix:

Spinach is so great in salad. I enjoy adding apple slivers or dried cranberries to mine but the list is endless when it comes to toppings. Try using thinly sliced red onions, carrots, and apples from this week’s box. For dressing, mix apple cider or balsamic vinegar with olive oil and Dijon to taste.

Spinach isn’t just for salad. It is used in cooking just as often or more often than used fresh. If I have something like this mix in my fridge I’ll find myself adding it to just about anything: scrambled eggs, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, pasta, sautés, or even my smoothies.

This recipe comes with an Asian spin. I’m going to have to try to make their dressing!

Brussels Sprouts:

The first time I ever tasted caramelized Brussels sprouts, I was sold! It was at one of the Klesick dinners and out of all the dishes, it stole the show. I don’t think I’d ever tasted such a decedent vegetable in my life! Here’s how to cook them in the oven (they also caramelize well when sautéed!):

Preheat oven to 425°F. Trim off the bottom(don’t take off too much or they simply fall apart) and outer leaves and slices lengthwise. Toss with olive oil(about a tablespoon), salt, pepper, and mix until coated thoroughly. Roast on a baking sheet until tender and caramelized, about 20 minutes. Now, you can just eat them like this but if you want to make them truly amazing try drizzling with equal parts olive oil and balsamic vinegar and a little honey. Mix together and add salt to taste. I can’t wait for Thanksgiving so I can serve this dish!

Delicata Squash:

This is one of my favorite winter squash. For one, because it’s so delicious and two, because it’s so easy to prepare! All you have do is slice it and cook it. You don’t even have to worry about the skins because they are tender enough that you can eat them right along with the flesh. They are also a much easier squash to cut than their larger counterparts so you don’t have to feel like you’re going to skewer yourself trying to slice the thing open. There many ways to cook and use this delicate squash: they can be baked, steamed, grilled or sautéed. They make a great side to almost any dish or can be added to pasta, salad, sauté, or stuffed. You can also add the creamy flesh to soup which makes for a thick smooth texture (and a wonderful nutty flavor!). My sister recently steamed up some delicata and added it with tomato soup as the base for her vegetable soup. It was a match made in heaven! It added a wonderful thick creamy texture and the flavor was fantastic.

A fast and simple way to eat Delicata squash is baked. Cut in half lengthwise, remove seed and cut halves crosswise into ½ inch wedges (or skip this step and leave in halves). Toss/slather in some softened-to-melted butter and about ½ tsp of salt. Spread out on a cookie sheet and sprinkle with brown sugar. Roast in the oven at 425°F for about 25-30 minutes, tossing once or twice, until browned. The seeds can be roasted as well, the same way you would do pumpkin seeds.

Try this recipe with roasted delicata and red onions for a savorier dish.

Anna – Menu Planner

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Pre-Order Your Local Berries, Canning Veggies, and Herbs!

bulk produce 2015

 

For 17 years, we’ve been bringing the local harvest to you.

Each season, while the Northwest harvest is at its peak – we deliver it to your door!

How can you get your share of the local good? It’s simple. Contact us to let us know which of the bulk fruits and/or veggies you’d like, and we’ll put your order on our reservation list. When the harvest is at its peak. We will contact you before sending out your order, so that you can prepare for its arrival.

locally and organically grown

 

Please note, all harvest dates are approximate and are subject to the laws and whiles (and wiles!) of nature. 

  • Strawberries: Half Flat (6×1 pint): $24 – Available now!!
  • Harvest dates: June-August (note, some gaps in between harvests to be expected)
  • Blueberries: Full flat (12×1 pint): $40
  • Half Flats (6×1 pint): $22
  • Harvest dates: late June-August.
  • Raspberries: Half-flats (6×1/2 pint): $22.
  • Harvest dates: late June-August.
  • Pickling Cucumbers: Order as many as you need!
  • 5-lb. units. $7.50/ 5 lbs.
  • 40 lb. boxes. $50
  • Harvest dates: August-September
  • Dill: 1 bunch is a 2-3 inches in diameter. $4/bn.
  • Harvest dates: August-September
  • Green Beans:
  • 5 lbs. $15
  • 20 lb. boxes. $45
  • Harvest dates: August-September
  • Bulk Basil: available in 1 lb. units (about a grocery bag full). $8.50/lb.
  • Harvest dates: August

Click here to email us your order.

*Important note: delivery week for these bulk orders are determined by harvest dates. If you will be away on vacation during specific weeks this summer, please let us know so that we don’t schedule your delivery while you are away. 

These items are served on a first-come, first-serve basis. Availability may be limited. 

Bulk orders will be delivered on your regular box of good delivery day.