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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/15/18)

Kohlrabi

Mike (our customer caretaker) is Kohlrabi’s biggest fan so if you need some convincing to try this alien-like vegetable, give him a call;) Kohlrabi is typically eaten raw—peeled, sliced and added to a salad or used for serving with a dip. You can also steam, boil, bake, grill, or roast them. Just peel away the outside thick skin first. Add them to soups or stews. Try grating them and toss with grated carrots or apples to make a slaw!

You can also boil and mash them with potatoes or other root vegetables. Stir-fry them with other vegetables, or julienne them and fry them like potatoes. Look for Indian recipes using kohlrabi as they are often used in Indian cuisine.

Peaches

Test for ripeness by fragrance and by gently pressing around the stem – it should give to light pressure when ripe. Place in sealed container in the fridge when ripe – if you leave them exposed to the open air in the fridge, they will wrinkle from dehydration. Peaches, like other stonefruit, ripen from the inside to the outside, so if fruit is soft all over it is more likely overripe. Try peaches for breakfast paired with yogurt or hot/cold cereal, as a topping to a green salad, and as an ingredient in fruit salads. Peaches are also great on the grill, but be sure to use slightly less ripe fruit, it will hold up better without breaking apart/juicing. And of course, peaches bake up fabulously into crisps, pies, and sauces!

 

Featured Recipe: Kohlrabi, Carrot and Lettuce Slaw

A fresh slaw made with kohlrabi, lettuce and carrot, perfect as a side dish or a light lunch.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

2 large kohlrabi bulbs peeled

2 large carrots peeled

2 cups finely chopped lettuce or combination of lettuce and kale

handful chopped green onion (or diced sweet onion)

1 cup almonds chopped

1 lemon juice retained

salt and black pepper to season

3 tablespoons sesame seeds

your choice of dressing

Instructions:

Grate both the kohlrabi and carrot roughly in a large mixing bowl.

Add the lettuce and toss to mix.

Add the green onion, almonds, lemon juice, seasoning and sesame seeds. Mix well.

Serve your salad with your choice of dressing.

RECIPE NOTES

Great as a light lunch, and quick to prepare as a side dish with your main dish.

Recipe adapted from aninas-recipes.com

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Know Your Produce – Kohlrabi

Have you ever eaten a kohlrabi? These little sputnik-shaped vegetables come in green or purple, can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. The word kohlrabi is German for cabbage turnip (kohl as in cole-slaw, and rübe for turnip), though kohlrabi is more related to cabbage and cauliflower than to root vegetables. We usually eat them raw, just peeled, sliced and added to a salad, but they are also delicious cooked and are often used in Indian cuisine.

If the kohlrabi leaves are still attached to the bulb, trim the  m and store separately. If the leaves are in good shape—firm and green—they can be cooked but will need to be used within a couple of days. The bulbs should be stored, unwashed, in a plastic bag. They will hold for about a week in the refrigerator.

Simple preparation: Tender, young kohlrabi is delicious eaten raw. Peel the outer skin with a paring knife. Slice, dice, or grate, and add to salads. Use on raw vegetable platters or serve with a creamy dip. Substitute in recipes calling for radishes. Grated kohlrabi can be added to slaw, but lightly salt it first and let stand for several minutes. Squeeze to remove any excess water before adding dressi  ng. Kohlrabi can also be steamed or boiled. For this preparation don’t peel until after they are cooked. Steam or boil until bulbs are tender, peel skin, and season with butter, salt, and pepper, a cheese sauce, or just enjoy plain.

If the leaves attached to the kohlrabi bulb are fresh and green, they can be enjoyed as a cooked green. Wash the leaves and remove the ribs. Blanch in boiling water until just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain and squeeze excess water from leaves. Chop leaves, then sauté in a little olive oil or butter. Season with salt and pepper. Add a splash of vinegar or squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

From www.care2.com/greenliving/how-to-use-kohlrabi

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Fresh This Week Tips, Week 11.28.10

Navel Oranges
STORE: Refrigerate for up to two weeks.
PREP:  Peel the orange and remove the white pith, if desired. To section the already peeled fruit, cut away the outer and inner skin to expose the pulp. Then, run a sharp knife along the sides of the dividing membranes to release the sections. Work over a bowl to catch the juices.
For juicing, halve the fruit with the skin on and use an orange juicer.
For orange zest, scrub the outside of the orange with hot water and use a hand grater or vegetable peeler to remove the zest.
USE: Eat your navels as a delicious snack served as wedges, but you can also incorporate them into beverages, vinaigrettes and salads as a sweet and colorful accent.
image from flickr.com

Zucchini
STORE: Keep unwashed zucchini in a plastic bag and place in a cool area or inside the refrigerator for up to one week.
PREP: Wash zucchini by gently rubbing them under cool water. Slice off both ends of the zucchini. Cut them into rounds, spears or half moons.
USE: Zucchini is a versatile veggie. It can be grilled, cooked with pasta, stuffed or baked into breads and muffins. Make a healthy stir fry with zucchini and other veggies from this week’s box. Add a touch of butter to a hot skillet and toss in cut zucchini and other veggies of your choice such as carrots, cabbage or even squash (cooked). Season your stir fry to taste. Remove from heat when veggies are still crisp, but tender.
image from myrecipes.com

Red Leaf Lettuce
STORE: Store red leaf lettuce in the crisper of your refrigerator inside a sealed plastic bag. Use within three to five days.
PREP:  Rinse thoroughly to remove dirt and dry the leaves with a paper towel or in a salad spinner. Chop or tear to your preference.
USE: Use chopped lettuce as a base for a salad or the crunch in a sandwich. You can also make some tasty free-range chicken or tofu lettuce wraps.
image from flickr.com

Radishes
STORE: Store radishes wrapped in plastic with the leaves and stems removed in the coldest part of your refrigerator for four to seven days. You can also store them in a tupperware container filled with cold water and they will keep for up to two weeks.
PREP: Rinse radishes under cold water and keep them whole or slice them depending on their purpose.
USE: Radishes are a great, healthy snack and can be used atop salads or sandwiches, in sautées or pickled. Radishes have a refreshing peppery flavor and unbeatable crunch!
image from fotobank.ru

Parsnips
STORE: Store unwashed parsnips in a cool dark place, just as you would carrots. Wrapped in a paper towel and placed in a plastic bag in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator, they should last up to 2 weeks, if not longer. Cooked parsnips may be refrigerated and used within 3 days.
PREP: Parsnips need to be peeled. For cooked parsnips, many prefer to boil or steam the washed root and then scrape off the tougher skin to preserve nutritional value.
USE: The parsnip looks like a white, overgrown carrot. It is sweet with a texture like a sweet potato and can be eaten raw or cooked. You may grate them raw in salads, but we think they are best when roasted in the oven, with carrots, or steamed and mashed like potatoes. If adding to soups, wait until the last 5-10 minutes of cooking time so the parsnips don’t become mushy from overcooking. You may also substitute parsnips in most recipes that call for carrots.
From: http://homecooking.about.com/od/howtocookvegetables/a/parsniptips.htm
image from foodnetwork.com

Kohlrabi
STORE: With the leaf stems removed, kohlrabi can be stored in the refrigerator for several weeks. Storage life can be extended if placed in sealed plastic bags.
PREP: Wash and peel kohlrabi before using. The bulb can be sliced, cut into quarters, cubes or julienne strips.
USE: These interesting little vegetables can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. You can roast, steam or bake them, add them to a salad or curry or even quick pickle them:http://www.restaurantwidow.com/2006/07/kohlrabi_and_wh.html.
image from theperfectbite.blogs.com

Posted on

Know Your Produce: Kohlrabi

Have you ever eaten a kohlrabi? These little sputnik-shaped vegetables come in green or purple, can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. The word kohlrabi is German for cabbage turnip (kohl as in cole-slaw, and rübe for turnip) though kohlrabi is more related to cabbage and cauliflower than to root vegetables. We usually eat them raw, just peeled, sliced and added to a salad, but they are also delicious cooked and are often used in Indian cuisine.

From www.simplyrecipes.com